COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Anglo-Saxon Legal System
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
LAW 202
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives The aim of this course is to provide students with an insight into the substantive and procedural law of Anglo – Saxon Legal System, with special reference to the Law and Legal System of England and Wales, in order to better position the Continental European Legal System (Civil Law) among other legal systems and also to improve legal terminology skills.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Define in general terms the distinct legal systems within the United Kingdom
  • Define the sources of English law
  • Explain the emergence of Common Law,
  • Classify the court structure of English legal system as well as alternative dispute resolution methods thereof
  • • Compare different categories of the legal profession,
  • • Compare this legal system with Civil Law,
  • • Explain the basic concepts and terminology of the Law of Torts, the Law of Contracts and Criminal Law.
Course Description The Law and the Legal System of England and Wales, Legal Profession, the Law of Torts, the Law of Contracts and Criminal Law.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction to the Course: Major Legal Systems around the World, Legal Systems within the United Kingdom and the “Devolution”, Definition of and Relationship between the United Kingdom – England – Great Britain – Commonwealth, History of Anglo - Saxons and the Norman Conquest Useful original materials will be provided via Blackboard
2 Historical Sources of the Law of England and Wales: The Law of Anglo – Saxons, the System of General Eyre and the Emergence and Development of Common Law, Equity Law and the Clash between Common Law and Equity, Canon Law, the Law Merchant, Legislation (Steps to Constitutional Monarchy – Magna Carta, Simon de Montfort’s Parliament, the Bill of Rights) David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 8 – 20
3 Historical Sources of the Law of England and Wales (Cont.) David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 8 – 20
4 Legal Sources of the Law of England and Wales: Case Law (Ratio Decidenti and Obiter Dicta, Theory of Binding Precedent, Hierarchy of the Senior Courts, Declaratory Theory of Common Law), Statute Law (Introduction to the Westminster - House of Commons and House of Peers, Stages in Legislation, Statutory Construction, Delegated Legislation), Text Books, Local Custom David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 21 – 39.
5 The Courts And Tribunals Of England and Wales (Civil Courts, Criminal Courts, Tribunals, Alternative Dispute Resolution Methods – with special reference to Arbitration) David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 41– 68.
6 The Legal Profession in England and Wales (Barristers and Solicitors), Jury System David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 69 – 74; Catherine Elliot & Frances Quinn, English Legal System, pp. 149 -172.
7 Midterm Exam
8 Classification of Law of England and Wales and the Uncodified Constitution of the United Kingdom: Procedural & Substantive Law, Civil & Criminal Law, Statute & Common Law, Significant Constitutional Legal Documents David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 1 – 7.
9 The Law of Torts – I: Nature of Tort, Tort v. Crime, Tort v. Breach of Contract, Categories of Tort David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 174 – 229.
10 The Law of Torts – II: Defenses and Remedies in Tort, Limitation of Actions David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 174 – 229.
11 The Law of Contract – I : Freedom of Contract, Privity of Contract, Formation of Contract (Agreement, Contractual Intention, Consideration), Form of Contract, Content of Contract David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 97 – 172.
12 The Law of Contract – II: Defective Contracts, Discharge of Contracts, Breach of Contract, Limitation of Actions David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 97 – 172.
13 Criminal Law – I: Definition and Classification of Offences, Elements of Crime (Actus Reus & Mens Rea) David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 286 – 323.
14 Criminal Law – II: Defenses, Attempt, Sanctions David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, pp. 286 – 323.
15 Revision
16 Final Exam
Course Notes/Textbooks

David Barker & Colin Padfield, Law, 10th Ed., Butterworth-Heinemann Pub., 1998; Catherine Elliot & Frances Quinn, English Legal System, 3rd Ed., Pearson Education Pub., 2000.

 

*Subject-based up-to-date original sources will also be provided.

Suggested Readings/Materials

Kenneth Smith & Denis J. Keenan, English Law, 12th Ed., Pitman Pub.,1998; Phil Harris, An Introduction to Law, Cambridge Uni. Press, 7th Ed., 2007.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
1
40
Final Exam
1
60
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
60
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
40
Final Exams
1
62
    Total
150

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to possess the knowledge in legal terminology, concepts and principles.

X
2

To be able to solve the legal problems with an analytic and integral point of view.

X
3

To be able to evaluate the legal knowledge and abilities obtained with a critical approach.

X
4

To be able to evaluate the developments in legal theory and practice by monitoring local, international and interdisciplinary dimensions.

X
5

To be able to have awareness of social, professional and scientific principles of ethic behaviour.

X
6

To be able to take responsibility in solving problems by creative and innovative thinking.

X
7

To be able to interpret the legal norms with a sense of justice respectful to human rights and in the light of principles of democratic, secular and social state of law.

X
8

Working efficiently and effectively, learning how to be a team member, taking responsibilities, being open minded, constructive, open to criticism and having self confidence

X
9

To be able to use the daily scientific sources and court judgments in the framework of life time learning approach.

X
10

To be able to inform the related persons and institutions about legal matters both verbally and in written.

X
11

To be able to monitor the daily legal information/court decisions and interacts with the colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale” Level B1) .

X
12

To be able to use the information and communication technology together with the computer programs in a level required by the area of law (“European Computer Driving Licence, Advanced Level”).

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest