COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Introduction to Political Science
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PSIR 207
Spring
3
0
3
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives The primary purpose of the course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and key issues of political science.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define the basic concepts of political science.
  • identify the state formation process, and different types of states.
  • discuss basic concepts, leading thinkers, and similarities and differences of contemporary ideologies; liberalism, conservatism, socialism and fascism.
  • explain democracy by comparing the models of democracy.
  • compare different kinds of political parties and party systems.
  • compare different electoral systems.
  • identify presidential and parliamentary systems.
Course Description The course explores main subjects; the meanings of concepts of politics, power, legitimacy and authority; the emergence of modern state; nationalism; modern political ideologies; different government styles such as democracy and authoritarianism; political culture; organization ad mechanisms of legislative and executive branches; political parties and interest groups.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Presentation and an overview of the course: What is Political Science?
2 What is Politics? Key Concepts of Political Science: Power, Authority, Legitimacy, Sovereignty, Government Heywood, A. Politics, 2019. Ch. 1
3 Political Ideologies: Liberalism and Conservatism Heywood, Ch. 2
4 Political Ideologies:, Socialism and Fascism Heywood, Ch. 2
5 State Heywood, Ch. 3
6 Midterm Exam I
7 Democracy (Liberal Democracy and Models of Democracy) Heywood, Ch. 4
8 Nations and Nationalism Heywood, Ch. 6
9 Representations, Elections and Voting Heywood, Ch. 10
10 Political Parties and Party Systems Heywood, Ch. 11
11 Midterm Exam II
12 Constitutions, Law and Judges Heywood, Ch. 13
13 Machinery of Government: Assemblies and Executives Heywood, Ch. 14
14 Review of the Semester: Is Politics Broken? Heywood, Ch. 15
15 Review of the Semester
16 Final Exam
Course Notes/Textbooks

Andrew Heywood, 2019, Politics, 5th Edition, London: Red Globe Press.

ISBN 978–1–352–00548–6 hardback

ISBN 978–1–352–00545–5 paperback

*All course readings are available at the University Library and as open sources.

Suggested Readings/Materials ACADEMIC HONESTY: Honesty and trust are the most fundamental pillars of learning and are necessary foundation for success and academic freedom in a university. Hence, any behavior that jeopardizes the learning environment by violating the rules of academic honesty will not be tolerated or condoned: Violations of academic honesty include but are not limited to: Cheating or facilitating cheating • looking or attempting to look at another student's answers or allowing others to copy one's answers, • copying other student’s in-class or take-home exam answers or letting others use take-home exam answers, • using "cheat sheet," pre-programmed calculator if not allowed by the instructor, • having someone else prepare the term project or homework or letting others use one’s homework/term project/paper, • Assistance of another person in preparation of a tem paper/homework/project if not allowed by the instructor, • Taking an exam for another student, • Purchasing term projects or homework or other assignments, • Signing in place of another student using their name/signature/student id number, Plagiarism • showing the work of another as one's own, • Not properly citing an earlier own work, • Submitting the same homework/paper/term project in one more one course if not allowed by the instructor, • Inaccurately or inadequately citing sources including those from the Internet, Violations of academic honesty can result in disciplinary action, as stated in the "Student Disciplinary Rules and Regulation" of the University. http://www.ieu.edu.tr/en/bylaws/type/read/id/13 and http://kariyer.ieu.edu.tr/en/bylaws/type/read/id/81 By enrolling in the University, each student is assumed to have read the rules and regulations regarding academic dishonesty, and lack of knowledge of this policy is not an acceptable defense.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
2
50
Final Exam
1
40
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
60
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
42
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
2
24
Final Exams
1
32
    Total
170

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to possess the knowledge in legal terminology, concepts and principles.

X
2

Solves the legal problems with an analytic and integral point of view.

3

Evaluates the legal knowledge and abilities obtained with a critical approach.

X
4

Evaluates the developments in legal theory and practice by monitoring local, international and interdisciplinary dimensions.

X
5

Is conscious of social, professional and scientific principles of ethic behaviour.

X
6

Takes responsibility in solving problems by creative and innovative thinking.

7

Interprets the sources of law by ways of legal methodology.

8

To be able to interpret the legal norms with a sense of justice respectful to human rights and in the light of principles of democratic, secular and social state of law.

X
9

To be able to use the daily scientific sources and court judgments in the framework of life time learning approach.

10

Informs the related persons and institutions about legal matters both verbally and in written.

11

Monitors the daily legal information/court decisions and interacts with the colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale” Level B1).

12

Uses the information and communication technology together with the computer programs in a level required by the area of law (“European Computer Driving Licence, Advanced Level”).

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest