COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Design Research
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ID 304
Spring
2
2
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
-
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to provide students with research knowledge and skills related to design discipline. It reveals how research can lead and develop design practice and knowledge.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to identify a research problem related to design discipline.
  • Will be able to select appropriate research methods (including designerly methods) in the way of answering the research problem..
  • Will be able to collect data systematically by using qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  • Will be able to make analysis and synthesis on the findings.
  • Will be able to write essays on their research.
  • Will be able to make presentations on their research.
  • Will be able to make research individually and in groups.
Course Description In this course research is undertaken within the design discipline; students (individually and in groups) are expected to identify a research problem based on the theme given to them, apply different design research methods, analyze and synthesize the findings, write essays, and make presentations about their research.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction to the course. What is research? History of research in design discipline. Design research among other research traditions. Research about practice, research on the purposes of practice, research through practice. (Archer, 1999; Bayazıt, 2004; Cross, 2001; Langrish (notes); Wolfgang Jonas’ article Ralf Michel 2007) None
2 Discussion on HW-1. Writing references in-text and end-text with APA style. Research questions/problems and keywords about the theme. Focusing techniques: From broad topic to narrowed one. Identifying a research problem. (Booth et al, 2008; Blaxter et al, 2010) HW-1 References about the given theme.
3 Discussion on HW-2 and HW-3. HW-2 Write references with APA style. HW-3 Narrow down the research topic and identify the research problem.
4 Discussion on HW-4 and HW-5. Rethinking on the research problems. (Booth et al, 2008; Blaxter et al, 2010) Planning the structure of the research (title, subtitles, and references). Literature review. Academic reading and writing techniques. Revise the homeworks as HW-4 and HW-5.
5 Discussion on HW-6. HW-6 Research problem, references in APA style, contents/structure, literature review. Reading: “Research Revolution” Muratovski (2016).
6 Discussion on Presentation-1. Presentation-1 Poster presentation.
7 A summary of design research (history, key features, ‘research vs. practice’ relations, research positions, theoretical lenses, methodology). Everyday skills for research and introduction to design research methods (research families, approaches, techniques). Overview of research methods used in design. Discussion on human-centred design approach and participatory design. (Archer, 1999; Blaxter et al, 2010; Bryman, 2001, Crouch & Pearce, 2012; Hanington, 2003; Ideo Toolkit; Laurel, 2003; Martin & Hanington 2012; Muratovski, 2016; Sanders 2008; Visocky O’Grady, 2006) Revise the homework as HW-7 and revise Presentation-1.
8 Discussion on HW-8. Rethinking on methods for data collection, analysis and synthesis. (Blaxter et al, 2010; Ideo Toolkit; Laurel, 2003; Martin & Hanington 2012; Stickdorn & Schneider, 2011; Visocky O’Grady, 2006) HW-8 Present the methodology and methods of the research, give examples.
9 Discussion on HW-9. Selection of methods and planning the application. Revise the homework as HW-9.
10 Discussion on HW-10. HW-10 Apply the methods/data collection.
11 Discussion on HW-11. Analysis and synthesis of the data. Revise the homework as HW-11.
12 Discussion on HW-12. General evaluation of the research: Conclusion. HW-12 Analyze and synthesize data.
13 Discussion on HW-13 and HW-14. Revise the homework as HW-13. HW-14 Write the conclusion of the research.
14 Submission of Presentation-2. Brief for the final. Presentation-2 Write up an essay on the research.
15 Semester review. Preparation for the final submission.
16 Final submission. Preparation for the final submission.
Course Notes/Textbooks

Bella Martin & Bruce Hanington (2012) Universal Methods of Design, Massachusetts: Rockport. Brenda Laurel (eds.) (2003) Design Research: Methods and Perspectives, Cambridge: MIT Press. Bruce Archer (1999) On the Methods of Research, Ankara: METU Faculty of Architecture Press. Bruce Hanington (2003) Methods in the Making: A Perspective on the State of Human Research in Design, Design Issues, Vol.19, no.4, pp.9-18. IDEO Toolkits (http://www.designkit.org/mindsets). Jenn + Ken Visocky O’Grady (2006) A Designer’s Research Manual: Succeed in Design by Knowing your Clients and What They Really Need, Massachusetts: Rockport. John Z. Langrish, Notes on Writing a Thesis, Lecture Notes. Liz Sanders (2008) An Evolving Map of Design Practice and Design Research, ACM Interactions, Vol.XV.6, On Modeling Forum. Loraine Blaxter, Christina Hughes, and Malcolm Tight (2010) How to Research (4th edition), Berkshire: Open University Press. Nigan Bayazıt (2004) “Investigating Design: A Review of Forty Years of Design Research”, Design Issues, Vol.20, no.1, pp.16-29. Nigel Cross (2001) “Designerly Ways of Knowing: Design Discipline versus Design Science”, Design Issues, Vol.17, no.3, pp.49-55. Ralf Michel (2007) Design Research Now: Essays and Selected Projects, BIRD, Basel, Boston, Berlin: Birkhauser. Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams (2008) The Craft of Research (3rd edition), Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Readings/Materials

Christopher Crouch & Jane Pearce (2012) Doing Research in Design, London: Bloomsbury. Gjoko Muratovski (2016) Research for Designers: A Guide to Methods and Practice, Los Angeles: SAGE. IDEO-The Little Book of Design Research Ethics (2015) (https://lbodre.ideo.com/). Marc Stickdorn & Jakob Schneider (2011) This is Service Design Thinking, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
2
20
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
3
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
Study Hours Out of Class
12
0.5
6
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
28
Presentation / Jury
2
5
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exams
1
12
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

X
13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest