COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Product Design Studio III
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ID 303
Fall
2
6
5
9
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to broaden the students' understanding of industrial design practice. One or more design projects will be done where the social, cultural, economic, and political contexts are considered. Students will explore advanced aspects of material culture and visual culture in formulating a business strategy with a design focus.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to apply basic and advanced design methods and creativity techniques to given design problems.
  • Student will be able to apply industrial design as a core component of competitive advantage in organizations by identifying product/service opportunities.
  • Student will be able to find and interpret information that is relevant to the given design problems.
  • Student will be able to translate user needs into design problems.
  • Student will be able to develop ideas based on the defined problems.
  • Student will be able to make effective oral and visual presentations of their design concepts and design process.
  • Student will be able to apply and develop advanced skills in physical and CAD modeling and manual rendering techniques in the resolution of design problems.
  • Student will be able to apply new techniques in sharing ideas and working in groups.
Course Description This course will consist of one or more industrial design projects where students will undertake advanced design processes that focus on specific aspects of design problems for consumer products, services, or systems. Students will produce convincing explanations and arguments using virtual models and visual presentations of their concepts.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Explanation: Course objectives and structure. Discussion and Presentation: Cumulus 2020 Research - Pairs Syllabus. Concept discussions.
2 Research - Pairs Desk research findings
3 QUIZ: Research Project submission. Session: Discussions on the project brief (Products&Concepts/Problems) HW: Desk research. Concept systems/products. Research Project Submission and Presentation.
4 PSS and Problem Selection PSS in relation to the chosen concepts/problems Desk research findings
5 Field research MILESTONE 1: 3 Design Concept Ideas Design Idea sketches/Tech constraints and Specs.
6 Developed Conceptual Design Ideas + Initial Concepts Specs / Tech Brief and Schemes Design Idea sketches/Tech constraints and Specs.
7 MID-TERM: JURY 1. JURY 1 Submissions: 1. Desk research and field research findings (Poster) 2. 1:1 3D physical model and adv. schemes
8 Design Development. Announced submission requirements
9 Adv. Design Development. MILESTONE 2: 3D physical model Product design proposal presentations
10 Refined Product and Product Identity. 3D physical model Announced submission requirements
11 3D physical model Announced submission requirements
12 MID-TERM: JURY 2. JURY 2 Submissions: 1. Design Process. 2. Advanced 1:1 3D physical model
13 Advanced 1:1 3D physical model and revisions. Announced submission requirements
14 Advanced 1:1 3D physical model and Product Identity. Announced submission requirements
15 Revision of the semester. Announced submission requirements
16 Finals Week - (TBA) PROJECT SUBMISSON AND PRESENTATION. Announced PROJECT submission requirements
Course Notes/Textbooks Yok / NA
Suggested Readings/Materials Bruce, Margaret and J R Bessant. 2002. Design in Business : Strategic Innovation Through Design. Harlow, England ; London ; New York: Financial Times/Prentice Hall. Cagan, J. and Vogel, C.M. (2001). Creating Breakthrough Products: Innovation from Product Planning to Program Approval, FT Press. Keinonen, Turkka and Roope Takala. 2006. Product Concept Design : A Review of the Conceptual Design of Products in Industry. New York]: Springer. Kelley, Tom and Jonathan Littman. 2001. The Art of Innovation : Lessons in Creativity From IDEO, Americas Leading Design Firm. New York: Currency/Doubleday. Riley, Patrick G. 2002. The OnePage Proposal : How to Get Your Business Pitch Onto One Persuasive Page. New York: ReganBooks. Schifferstein, H and Paul, Hekkert. 2008. Product Experience. San Diego, CA: Elsevier. Snyder, Carolyn. 2003. Paper Prototyping: The Fast and Easy Way to Design and Refine User Interfaces. San Francisco: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers. Squires, Susan and Bryan Byrne. 2002. Creating Breakthrough Ideas : The Collaboration of Anthropologists and Designers in the Product Development Industry. Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey. Stanton, Neville. 2005. Handbook of Human Factors and Ergonomics Methods. Boca Raton: CRC Press. Suri, Jane Fulton and Matthew Marsh. 2000. “Scenario Building as an Ergonomics Method in Consumer Product Design.” Applied Ergonomics, vol. 31:151157. Elsevier Science Ltd. Van der Heijden, Kees. 2005. Scenarios : The Art of Strategic Conversation. Chichester, West Sussex ; Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons. Vogel, C.M., Cagan, J., Boatwridght, P. (2005), The Design of Things to ComeHow Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products, Wharton School Publishing, New Jersey. Walsh, V., Roy, R., Bruce, M. and Potter, S. (1992), Winning by Design, Technology, Product Design and International Competitiveness, Oxford, Basil Blackwell. Journal References: Design Management Journal, Harvard Business Review, Business Week. Web References: www.dmi.org / www.designmanagementeurope.com / www.designinbusiness.com / www.businessweek.com / www.designcouncil.org / www.aiga.org. Textbooks, journal articles and other sources, that apply to the specific design problem that is set on the occasion, will be specified as necessary.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
20
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
2
40
Final Exam
-
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
6
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
8
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
23
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
2
24
Final Exams
    Total
270

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

X
9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

X
13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest