COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Design Semiotics for Industrial Design
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ID 204
Spring
3
0
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Exploring the role of semiotics in shaping products, services and systems. Studying and reading products through semiotic theories and analytical applications.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to analyze works of design through semiotic frameworks.
  • Student will be able to utilize the theories and issues of basic semiotics in the study of concrete examples.
  • Student will be able to observe the effect of iconic, indexical and symbolic signs in design.
  • Student will be able to classify existing products with respect to their meanings in a broader system of objects.
  • Student will be able to design products with intended significations.
Course Description This course provides the students with tools to analyze designed products from a semiotic perspective. It aims to introduce students with the major ideas, concepts and methods of analysis involved in semiotics and communication studies. With particular emphasis on our contemporary material culture, several important concepts will be examined and put into critical use in analyzing as well as designing new products. These concepts include the sign, paradigm, syntagm, redundancy, entropy, code, denotation, connotation, myth, metaphor, metonymy, ideology, representation, kitsch, encoding / decoding, and taste.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction & Definitions of Design -
2 An Introduction to Semiology Daniel Chandler, Ch 1 “Models of the Sign”, or John Fiske “Communication, Meaning and Signs”
3 Advanced Concepts in Semiology 1: Codes John Fiske, Ch 4 “Codes” or Daniel Chandler, Ch 5 “Codes”
4 Advanced Concepts in Semiology 2: Signification John Fiske, Ch 5 “Signification”
5 Question of Meaning in Everyday Things Roland Barthes, “Semantics of the Object”
6 Design and Popular Culture The handout on “Kitsch”
7 Midterm exam None
8 Kitsch Exhibition and Evaluation None
9 Design as Rhetoric Richard Buchanan, “Declaration by Design: Rhetoric, Argument, and Demonstration in Design Practice”
10 Design Semiotics 1: Time Douglas Freake, “The Semiotics of Wristwatches” / Richard Porch, “The Digital Watch: Tribal Bracelet of the Consumer Society”
11 Design Semiotics 2: Language None
12 Design Semiotics 3: Music None
13 Design Semiotics 4: Visualization and Design Step by step guide to “Semiotic analysis of design”
14 Analysis Assignments 1 None
15 Analysis Assignments 2 None
16 Review of the semester None
Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials Barthes Roland. Elements of Semiology, Hill and Wang; Reissue edition (April 1, 1977)Barthes, Roland. Empire of The Signs, Hill and Wang (September 1, 1983)Berger, Asa. Signs in Contemporary Culture, An Introduction to Semiotics, Sheffield Pub Co; 2nd edition (October 1, 1998)Chandler, Daniel. 2002." Semiotics: The Basics". New York: Routledge.Cobley, Paul and Jansz, Litza. 2000. "Introducing Semiotics (originally entitled Semiotics for Beginners)". Cambridge, UK: Icon Books.Eco, Umberto (1979), Theory of Semiotics (Advances in Semiotics), Indiana University PressGuiraud, Pierre. Göstergebilim (trans. Mehmet Yalçın), İstanbul İmge, 2001Hodge, Robert and Kress, Gunther. 1998. "Social Semiotics." Cambridge, UK: Polity Press. Richards, Matt.” Semiotic Analysis of Dark Night Movie Posters”, COMM 403 Media Studies Rifat, M. "Homo Semioticus ve Genel Göstergebilim Sorunları". İstanbul: Cogito, Yapı Kredi Yayınları.Silverman, Kaja. 1983. "The Subject of Semiotics". New York: Oxford University Press, Inc.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
5
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
3
15
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
1
25
Final Exam
1
35
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
6
65
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
35
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
10
3
30
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
3
4
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
6
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
10
Final Exams
1
14
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

X
9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

X
13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest