COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Furniture Design
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
FFD 301
Fall
0
4
2
5
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The content of this course aims at providing the students with an in depth knowledge of the field of furniture design and the important interplay between user, space and product in a contemporary context. The students are informed about current design trends and work on design scenarios considering substantial emotional, expressive and sensorial values. The course aim to provide the students on technical and constructive skills useful to deal with furniture design related problems.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to apply basic design principles, with focus on furniture design.
  • Student will be able to evaluate, select and apply information and research findings to furniture design.
  • Student will be able to confidently use form, function and construction, technical issues in design process from sketches to prototype.
  • Student will be able to bring about problem solving methods from idea generation to production stage.
  • Student will be able to produce competent presentation drawings accross a range of appropriate media and integrate oral and visual material to present furniture design ideas clearly.
  • Student will be able to select, interpret and apply appropriate ergonomic and anthropometric data.
  • Student will be able to apply materials and contemporary issues affecting furniture design.
Course Description This class is based on a hierarchy of design process learning skills, which build on each other: knowledge; comprehension; application; analysis; synthesis; and evaluation. These skills will be developed in class discussions and should be evident in the research reports and Project submissions at the end of the class. The course will be structured with two main exercises that will guide the students to the production of a working prototype.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction to the Course None
2 WORKSHOP 01 - Introduction to Workshop 01 / Instructor Presentations 1: Technical Aspects of Furniture Design and Presentation of Case Study 01 / Announcement of HW 1
3 WORKSHOP 01 - Submission and general discussions of HW 1 / Studio Critics / Instructor Presentations 2: Technical Aspects of Furniture Design / Announcement of HW2 Homework 1
4 WORKSHOP 01 - Submissions and general discussions of HW 2 / Studio Critics / Instructor Presentations 3: Theory and History of Furniture Design Homework 2
5 WORKSHOP 01 - Prototyping and Critics Jury Requirements
6 JURY01 / EXHIBITION of WSHOP 01 + Presentation of Term Project / Announcement of HW3
7 WORKSHOP 02 - Introduction to Workshop 02 / Submissions and general discussions of HW 3 / Studio Critics /Announcement of HW4 Homework 3
8 WORKSHOP 02 - Studio Critics and Design Developments Homework 4
9 WORKSHOP 02 - Design Finalization; Studio Critics / Announcement of Midterm Jury Requirements Studio Critics and Design Developments and Prototyping Announced by the Instructors
10 WORKSHOP 02 - Studio Critics and Prototyping Announced by the Instructors
11 WORKSHOP 02 - Preliminary Jury Announced by the Instructors
12 WORKSHOP 02 - Workshop and Prototyping / Model Making Announced by the Instructors
13 WORKSHOP 02 - Workshop and Prototyping / Model Making Announced by the Instructors
14 WORKSHOP 02 - Workshop and Prototyping / Model Making Announced by the Instructors
15 JURY01 / EXHIBITION of WSHOP 01 / FINAL EXHIBITION
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Notes/Textbooks

• Dal Fabbro, Mario, 1957,  ‘How to build modern Furniture’. New York, USA: F. W. Dodge Coorporation. (1957).• Dal Fabbro, Mario, 1957,  ‘How to build modern Furniture’. New York, USA: F. W. Dodge Coorporation. (1957).

Suggested Readings/Materials • New Chairs: Innovations in Design, Technology, and Materials, Mel Byars • Materials for Inspirational Design by Chris Lefteri • Geometry of Design: Studies in Proportion and Composition, Kimberly Elam • Furniture in History: 3000 B.C. 2000 A.D (2nd Edition) (Hardcover), Leslie Pina • Illustrated History of Furniture: From the Earliest to the Present Time (Paperback), Frederick Litchfield (Author) • Design Meets Disability (Hardcover), Graham Pullin • The Making of Design: From the First Model to the Final Product (Paperback), Gerrit Terstiege • Greenhalgh, Paul. Quatations and Sources on Design and Decorative Arts. Manchester: Manchester University Pres • Sparke, Penny. A Century of Design. New York: Barron’s, 1998. • Woodham, Jonathan M. TwentiethCentury Design. Oxford: Oxford University Pres, 1997.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
5
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
15
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
5
25
Presentation / Jury
2
15
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
10
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
4
64
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
10
2
20
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
5
3
Presentation / Jury
2
6
Project
1
27
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exams
    Total
148

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

X
9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest