COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Moot Court
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
LAW 321
Fall/Spring
3
0432423
3
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Service Course
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course Discussion
Problem Solving
Case Study
Q&A
Lecture / Presentation
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives The purpose of this course is to prepare the students for participation in the phases of petition and oral discussions of the international and local moot court competitions like firstly, Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot and then Frankfurt Investment Moot, Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot, Telders International Moot, International Criminal Court Moot, Young ISTAC Moot, ELSA Moots. By this way, it aims that the students will strengthen their theoretical knowledge of law and learn about the practice.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Compete in national and international virtual court competitions.
  • Reason a hypothetical event according to the rules of law.
  • Apply abstract legal norms to the concrete events.
  • Submit claims and defenses orally and in writing both in Turkish and English.
  • Present their arguments in a clear and understandable way in a limited time.
Course Description In this course, students will experience preparing lawsuits and reply petitions regarding the dispute, and participating in the virtual court as plaintiff, defendant and judge/arbitrator.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction to the moot court competitions Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 1, “The Vis Moot: A Lifetime Experience”, 1-13; Part 2, “The Vis Moot: Facts and Figures”, 13-35.
2 Discussion of general issues related to the dispute topic of the moot Tekinalp/Nomer/Odman Boztosun, Part 3, Chp. 5, “International Arbitration”, 215-219.
3 Discussion of general issues related to the dispute topic of the moot Atamer/Butler/Schwenzer, Chp. 5, “Arbitration and the CISG”, 59-86.
4 Presentation of the case Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 3, “How to Start”, 35-57.
5 Distribution of the subjects to be analyzed by the students and first observations Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 3, “How to Start”, 35-57.
6 Discussion of the findings of the research Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 3, “How to Start”, 35-57.
7 Submission of the plaintiff's petition Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 4, “How to Write Effective Memoranda”, 35-57.
8 Submission of the defendant’s petition Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 4, “How to Write Effective Memoranda”, 35-57.
9 Preparing the arguments for oral pleading Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 5, “How to Present Your Case Before the Arbitral Tribunal”, 95-145.
10 Preparation of the competing teams Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 6, “Seven Days in Vienna and/or Hong Kong”, 145-173.
11 Preparation of the competing teams Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 6, “Seven Days in Vienna and/or Hong Kong”, 145-173.
12 Preparation of the competing teams Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 7, “Where to Go From Here: Life Goes on After the Moot”, 173-181.
13 Preparation of the competing teams Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 8, “Views from the Dachgeschoss”, 181-207.
14 Preparation of the competing teams Risse/Altenkirch/Herbst et al, Part 8, “Views from the Dachgeschoss”, 181-207.
15 Presentations of the competing teams
16 Presentations of the competing teams
Course Notes/Textbooks

Jörg Risse/Markus Altenkirch/Ragnar Herbst et al, The Complete (but Unofficial) Guide to the Willem C Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot, 6th ed., London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2022, ISBN: 9781509957194.

Suggested Readings/Materials

Gülören Tekinalp/Ergin Nomer/Ayşe Odman Boztosun, Private International Law in Turkey, Alphen aan den Rijn: Kluwer Law International, 2012, ISBN: 9789041141637; Yesim Atamer/Petra Butler/Ingeborg Schwenzer, Current Issues in the CISG and Arbitration, The Hague: Eleven International Publishing, 2014, ISBN: 9789462360976. 9789460948701, https://eds.p.ebscohost.com/eds/ebookviewer/ebook?sid=262e62c7-eb76-4036-9017-2c11883d31ec%40redis&vid=1&rid=1&format=EB.

 

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
50
Presentation / Jury
1
50
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
2
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
42
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
45
Presentation / Jury
1
45
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exams
    Total
180

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to possess the knowledge in legal terminology, concepts and principles.

2

To be able to solve the legal problems with an analytic and integral point of view.

3

To be able to evaluate the legal knowledge and abilities obtained with a critical approach.

4

To be able to evaluate the developments in legal theory and practice by monitoring local, international and interdisciplinary dimensions.

5

To be able to have awareness of social, professional and scientific principles of ethic behaviour.

6

To be able to take responsibility in solving problems by creative and innovative thinking.

7

To be able to interpret the legal norms with a sense of justice respectful to human rights and in the light of principles of democratic, secular and social state of law.

8

Working efficiently and effectively, learning how to be a team member, taking responsibilities, being open minded, constructive, open to criticism and having self confidence

9

To be able to use the daily scientific sources and court judgments in the framework of life time learning approach.

10

To be able to inform the related persons and institutions about legal matters both verbally and in written.

11

To be able to monitor the daily legal information/court decisions and interacts with the colleagues in a foreign language (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale” Level B1) .

12

To be able to use the information and communication technology together with the computer programs in a level required by the area of law (“European Computer Driving Licence, Advanced Level”).

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest