COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Industrial Design Studio II
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PD 409
Fall
2
6
5
9
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The focus of 4th year design studio is on local and global “Design for The Real World” (Papanek, 1984). The aim is to implement projects and to supervise students to find creative solutions for problems through Product Design. The context of this design course consists of issues on social, environmental, physiological basic needs of human being and design solutions for production with minimum energy and consumption, supporting sustainability and responsible design are.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to define and plan a design project/problem.
  • Student will be able to gather and evaluate information using proper research methods.
  • Student will be able to write a design brief.
  • Student will be able to develop a design concept and design according to his/her brief.
  • Student will be able to apply advanced visual and oral presentation techniques.
Course Description This course consists of three advanced product design project and experience apply on both as individual and team work. The first project is a short term one to start and other two is 6week projects.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction None
2 Project 1 PUSHKA Transportation Design Group Project research Research
3 P1 PUSHKA Transportation Design Group Project research Research
4 P1 PUSHKA Transportation Design Group Project research / P1 Presentation I Research / Presentation:
5 P1 PUSHKA Transportation Design Project Brief / P1 Project Brief, System Design 7 FINAL JURY Research / Research and System Design development and Submission
6 P2 Land & Marine Transportation Design System Design Group Project / P2 Introduction II System Design development / Brief, Outcomes of Research, Short Movie, Presentation Boards
7 P2 Land & Marine Transportation Design System Design Group Project System and Product Design Research, System & Product Design development
8 P2 Land & Marine Transportation Design System Design Group Project Development Research, System & Product Design development
9 P2 Land & Marine Transportation Design System Design Group Project Development Product Design Sketches
10 P2 Land & Marine Transportation Design System Design Group Project Development Product Design Sketches / System Scheme, Business Model, Design (3D & 2D), Presentation
11 P2 Land & Marine Transportation Design System Design Group Project PRELIMINARY JURY Research
12 P2 Presentation I / P2 System Scheme, Concept Generation Brief, Outcomes of Research / Research, Product Design Sketches
13 P2 Concept Generation Research & sketches
14 P2 Product Design and Model 2D & 3D Presentation materials & Model Making
15 P2 Product Model Production Model Making
16 FINAL JURY (Dates will be announced) / P1 SUBMISSION / P2 FINAL SUBMISSION Re-take on the materials submitted for Project I / Brief, Research Folder, Presentation, Design (3D & 2D), Model.
Course Notes/Textbooks There is no special textbook for this course. However, some reading materials are assigned by instructors on an ad hoc basis. Each student, during the course of the project, will necessarily do desk and field research and should become familiar with the science and information that is available on their topic.
Suggested Readings/Materials Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change, Victor Papanek, 1984, Thames and Hudson Ltd, London. The Green Imperative: Ecology and ethics in design and architecture, Victor Papanek, 1995, Thames and Hudson Ltd, London. Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, William McDonough, Michael Braungart, 2002, Publisher: Rodale Books. The EcoDesign Handbook: A Complete Sourcebook for the Home and Office Alastair FuadLuke, March 2005, Thames and Hudson Ltd. Design for Sustainability (D4S) manualDfS TUD & UNEP, 2006, http://www.d4sde.org/. Biomimicry: Innovation inspired by nature, Janine M. Benyus, 1997, William Morrow & Company, New York. Droog Design, Spirit of the nineties ed. Renny Ramakers and Gijs Bakker, 1998, 010 Publishers, Rotterdam. Ecodesign Navigator: A key resource in the drive towards environmentally efficient products, Matthew Simon and others, 1998. Factor Four, Doubling wealth, halving resource use, Ernst von Weizsaecker, 1997, Earthscan publishers. Green Design, Design for the Environment Dorothy Mackenzie, 1997 (2nd edition), Laurence King Publishing, London. Lightness: The inevitable renaissance of minimum energy structures, Adriaan Beukers, Ed van Hinte, 2005, 010 Publishers www.010publishers.nl. New Business for Old Europe, Product Service Development, Competitiveness and Sustainability, Edited by Arnold Tukker and Ursula Tischner, 2006. Our Ecological Footprint, Reducing Human Impact on the Earth, Mathis Wackernagel and William Rees, 1996. Our private sky, R. Buckminster Fuller, The Art of Design Science, Edited by Joachim Krausse and Claude Lichtenstein, 1999, Lars Muller Publishers. Birkhauser VerlagTrespassers, Inspirations for ecoefficient design, Conny Bakker and Ed van Hinte, 1999, 010 Publishers www.010publishers.nl. World changing: A user's guide for the 21st century, Edited by Alex Steffen.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
5
Laboratory / Application
2
20
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
3
45
Project
2
30
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
8
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
8
128
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
6
90
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
3
3
Project
2
20
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exams
    Total
267

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

X
9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest