COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Industrial Design Studio I
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PD 314
Spring
2
6
5
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to apply a broad understanding of industrial design practice to the thorough exploration of design problems. One or more design projects will be done where consideration of the context of a product, system or service will be combined with advanced appreciation for material and visual culture in the detailed technical execution of the design problems.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to apply basic and advanced design methods and creativity techniques to given design problems.
  • Student will be able to interpret information that is relevant to the given design problems.
  • Student will be able to make effective oral and visual presentations of their design concepts and design process.
  • Student will be able to apply advanced skills in physical and CAD modeling and manual rendering techniques in the resolution of design problems.
  • Student will be able to work on design problems of a high degree of technical complexity to solve problems of design, utility, as well as production.
  • Student will be able to collaborate with industrial partners to gain experience in discussing their design problems and presenting their design process and concepts.
  • Student will be able to produce prototypes of design concepts for the purposes of testing and simulation, and for presenting to and convincing decision makers.
Course Description This course will consist of one or more industrial design projects in association with industrial or institutional partners. Students will undertake advanced design processes, to a high degree of technical detail, that focus on specific aspects of the design problem for consumer products, services, or systems. Students will produce convincing virtual models and visual presentations of their product concepts.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Explanation: Course objectives and structure. Introduction and presentation for the Project I. Student Grouping/ Inclass Study Syllabus. Research files.
2 Findings draft presentations and discussions Project I requirements will be announced.
3 PROJECT I SUBMISSION (group). In-class study and brainstorming.
4 Proje II Individual Project Briefs/Design idea development. System&Service/Product Sketches
5 Design idea development. System/Service/Product Sketches
6 PRESENTATION I: Problem definition through video (Group) and Service&System /Product design idea proposals/ Service&System/Product design idea development. Presentation I requirements will be announced. Service&System /Design idea sketches.
7 JURY I: Service&System /Product design proposal (individual). Service&System/Product design concept refinement. Development on Service&System /Design idea sketches..
8 System /Product design development. Jury I requirements will be announced.
9 Service&System/Product design refinement.3D model development. Announced submission requirements
10 Service&System /Product design refinement. II - No Class Presentation II requirements will be announced.
11 PRESENTATION : Service&System /Product design proposal. II - 3D model refinement. Announced submission requirements
12 3D model development and identity applications/ JURY II: Advanced 3D model. Jury II requirements will be announced.
13 3D model development. Advanced 3D physical model. Announced submission requirements
14 3D model development. PROJECT II SUBMISSON. Project II requirements will be announced.
15 Semester Review.-Makeup Course TBA
16 Final Exam/Exhibition TBA
Course Notes/Textbooks Papers and presentations related with the projects conducted during the semester.
Suggested Readings/Materials Cuffaro, Dan and Zaksenberg, Isaac (2013). The Industrial Design Reference & Specification Book: Everything Industrial Designers Need to Know Every Day. Rockport Publishers. Hallgrimsson, Bjarki (2012). Prototyping and Modelmaking for Product Design (Portfolio Skills). Laurence King Publishing. Julier, Guy (2014). The Culture of Design, 3rd ed. London: Sage Publications Ltd. Keinonen, Turkka K. and Takala, Roope (Eds.) (2006). Product Concept Design. Springer. Lefteri, Chris (2012). Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design (2nd Ed.). Laurence King Publishing Moggridge, Bill (2007). Designing Interactions. The MIT Press Norman, Don (2013). The Design of Everyday Things (Revised Edition). Basic Books. Norman, Don (2005). Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things. Basic Books. Rogers, Everett M. (2003). Diffusion of Innovations. Free Press. Ulrich, K., and Steven E. (2004). Product Design and Development, 3rd ed. New York, NY: McGrawHill. Verganti, R. (2009). Design-driven innovation: changing the rules of competition by radically innovating what things mean. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press. Vogel, C.M., Cagan, J., Boatwridght, P. (2005). The Design of Things to Come: How Ordinary People Create Extraordinary Products. , New Jersey: Wharton School Publishing Textbooks, journal articles and other sources, that apply to the specific design problem that is set on the occasion, will be specified as necessary.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
20
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
-
Project
1
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
2
40
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
-
-
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
6
Study Hours Out of Class
0
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
-
Project
1
52
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
2
25
Final Exams
-
    Total
240

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

X
9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

X
13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest