COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Biomaterials: Designing with Living Systems
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ID 380
Fall/Spring
2
2
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
-
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Understanding how and what influences form in a biological system; Finding (noninvasive) tools and methods to manipulate form in a biological system;\nDesigning new forms in/with biological systems\n\nUnderstanding how and what influences form in a biological system;\nFinding (noninvasive) tools and methods to manipulate form in a biological system;\nDesigning new forms in/with biological systems
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to identify the main “foreign” agents that influence growth and activity in a biological system
  • Will be able to analyze and register elements that influence form variation in a biological system
  • Will be able to identify which constraint agents of a biological system can be hacked in order to tamper with the resulting final-shapes
  • Will be able to acknowledge the ethical and deontological aspects involved when working with living systems
  • Will be able to design systems that generate form by manipulating the growth constraints in a biological system
Course Description Presenting case studies of biological systems that have been hacked or manipulated; making field research for the observation of living systems (how flowers bloom, how trees grow, how insects dig, etc.); making experiments and sketching to forecast the action of the foreign agents on the system; designing new systems for form generating.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction (General overview) None
2 Biological system: concepts and definitions; Identifying hackable systems and agents that influence form-shaping in the presented systems. Assignment of homeworks / Introduction to project assignments Research and design concept definition for homeworks
3 Correlation between foreign agents’ activities and form-shaping: geometries, colors, textures, etc. / Bacteria painting preparation Presentation and discussion of the group research – brainstorming in class
4 Bacteria categorization and color properties / Bacteria painting Computer drawings and daily log
5 2D Surface study with bacteria tissue Computer drawings and daily log
6 2D Surface study with bacteria tissue continued Computer drawings and daily log / Research.
7 Ethics and deontology involved when working with living systems / 2D Surface study with bacteria tissue submission Sketches and daily log
8 Project presentations Presentation / Simulation: manipulation of the biological system - - expected results
9 3D object study: Mushroom properties & food applications / Design - mold development Sketches and daily log
10 Growing mushroom in the designed molds Sketches and daily log
11 Growing mushroom in the designed molds continued Homework submission
12 New food experience design Sketches and daily log
13 Looking for the impossible – creating scenarios / Design - mold development Sketches and daily log
14 Design - mold development Sketches and daily log + homework submission
15 Submission of the Final Project All elements required for a correct understanding and demonstration of the project.
16 Review of the Semester None
Course Notes/Textbooks Lecture Notes.
Suggested Readings/Materials

Munari, Bruno. Design as Art. Translated by Patrick Creagh. London: Penguin Books, 2008.

Thompson, D'Arcy Wentworth. On Growth and Form. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1917.

Simon, Herbert A. The Sciences of the Artificial: Massachusetts Instituite of Technology, 1996.

Antonelli, Paola. Bio Design: Nature + Science + Creativity: Thames & Hudson Ltd, London 2012.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
1
30
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
20
Project
4
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
Final Exam
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
8
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
Study Hours Out of Class
8
3
24
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
10
Project
4
12
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exams
    Total
156

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest