COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Product Design Studio I
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
ID 201
Fall
2
6
5
10
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce students to the principle methods and tools of the industrial design process through the exploration of design problems. One or more design projects will be done, where students will be introduced to design processes to consider the context of a product, and resolve its utility, its usability, its visual appearance, and its manufacturing aspects.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Student will be able to apply basic design methods and creativity techniques to given design problems.
  • Student will be able to identify, find and interpret information that is relevant to the given design problems.
  • Student will be able to develop skills in physical model making and CAD modelling and manual rendering techniques in the resolution of design problems.
  • Student will be able to experience design problems introducing to problems of the context of a product, and its utility, usability, visual appearance, and manufacturability.
  • Student will be able to use techniques and gain experience in sharing ideas and working in groups.
Course Description This course will consist of one or more introductory level industrial design projects. Students will undertake basic design processes, to a moderate degree of technical detail, that focus on specific aspects of the design problem for consumer products. Students will produce convincing models and visual presentations of their design concepts.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Orientation; General Overview of the course. Describing "product" design problems. / Introduction to Project 1, project brief discussion. None
2 Desk and Field research presentations and discussion. Start of Design process and design methods. Brainstorming applications (groups) and discussion / Studio critics and discussions. Design creativity techniques. Desk and Field research on Project 1. / Product concept definition and report. Idea sketches.
3 Studio critics and discussions. Design creativity techniques./ 2nd draft model. Design enhancement. Studio critics and discussions. Design creativity techniques. 1st Draft model. / Product concept refinement. Design sketches
4 Studio critics and discussions. Design finalization / Submission and Jury of Project 1. Students self assessment. Design drawings. 3rd draft model. / Completion of Project 1 final submission requirements
5 Introduction to Project 2, project brief discussion. Desk and Field research planning; Mind Map session (group) and discussion. / Desk and Field research presentations and discussion. Brainstorming applications (groups) and discussion. None / Desk and Field research on Project 2. Mind Map refinement (individual).
6 Sketch brainstorming session. Design creativity techniques. Instructors’ presentation 1 and discussion. / Product concept "green or red light" session and discussion. / Brainstorming refinement (individual). Idea sketches. / Product concept definition and report, concept alternatives sketches.
7 Product concept refinement session and discussion. Instructors presentation 2 and discussion./ Extreme designing session. Studio critics and discussions. Product concept refinement, design idea sketches / Design alternative sketches
8 1st set of models feedback session. Studio critics and discussions. Instructors presentation 3 and discussion./ Advertisement message discussion. Draft brochure-advertisement design session. Studio critics and discussions. 1st set of models. Manual design drawings./ Finalized Product concept Reports.
9 2nd set of models feedback session. Design creativity techniques. / Pre-Jury 2nd set of models Manual design drawings./ Jury Requirements.
10 Design creativity techniques. Studio critics and discussions. Instructors’ presentation 4 and discussion./ Studio critics and discussions. Manual design drawings. / Brochure/advertisement of the product.
11 Manual rendering session. Design creativity techniques. Studio critics and discussions./ 3rd set of models feedback session. Design creativity techniques. Manual design drawings (in scale) / 3rd set of models, Manual design drawings (in scale).
12 ISO standards and technical drawing session. Studio critics and discussions./ 4th set of models feedback session. Design creativity techniques. / Preliminary technical drawings (Manual, in scale). / 4th set of models.
13 5th set of models feedback session. Design creativity techniques. / Computer generated 3D modeling demonstration. Technical drawings feedback session 5th set of models. Refined manual design drawings (in scale) / Refined technical drawings (Computer generated, in scale) (bring your Laptop)
14 Computer generated 3D models feedback session. Final submission requirements discussion. / General discussions and feedback session. Review of the Semester. Computer generated 3D models (bring your Laptop)./ Finalized technical drawings (Computer generated, in scale) (bring your Laptop)
15 General discussions and feedback session. Review of the Semester. Related work
16 End of Semester – Jury Jury Requirements
Course Notes/Textbooks Tutorials will be provided according to project subject.
Suggested Readings/Materials Cross, Nigel. 2000. Engineering Design Methods: Strategies for Product Design. John Wiley & Sons. Jones, J. Christopher. 1992. Design Methods. Second Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.  Lumsdaine, Edward and Monika Lumsdaine. 1995. Creative Problem Solving; Thinking Skills for a Changing World. New York: McGrawHill. Margulies, Nancy and Nusa Maal. 2002. Mapping Inner Space, Second Edition. Chicago: Zephyr Press.  Nagashima, Noriyuki and Kunio Sano. 1994. Industrial Design Workshop 2: The Creative Process Behind Product Design. Tokyo: Meisei Publications.  Powell, Dick. 1990. Presentation Techniques: A Guide to Drawing and Presenting Design Ideas. Little, Brown. Schön, Donald. 1991. The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action. London: Ashgate Publishing Limited. Shimizu, Yoshiharu and Takashi Kojima, Masazo Tano, Shinji Matsuda. 2000. Models & Prototypes. GraphicSha.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
10
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
30
Project
2
60
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
Final Exam
-
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
5
100
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
6
Study Hours Out of Class
15
3
45
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
1
8
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
2
18
Project
2
40
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
Final Exams
-
    Total
297

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

X
6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

X
8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

X
9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

X
10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

X
11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest