COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
History of Art and Design 2
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
FFD 122
Spring
2
0
2
3
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Mode of Delivery -
Teaching Methods and Techniques of the Course
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The objective of this course is to introduce the external factors that influence the forms of art, design and architecture throughout history and to develop a visual sensibility about artistic and cultural production.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to describe the concept of “making” in art and design.
  • will be able to compare styles in art and design.
  • will be able to discuss the concept of “ideology” in art and design.
  • will be able to define the concept of “use” in art and design.
  • will be able to discuss the concept of “meaning” in art and design.
  • will be able to analyze a work of art or design using the above concepts, regardless of time period, style.
Course Description Introduction of the external factors that influence the forms of art, design and architecture throughout history and developing a visual sensibility about artistic and cultural production.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Required Materials
1 Introduction
2 MAKING 1: Materials, Tools and Techniques Frank Lloyd Wright, “Meaning of Materials – Glass,” from In the Cause of Architecture, 1975, 197-202. ISBN-10: 0070253501
3 MAKING 2: Process and Education ‘The Fed-ex logo’, from M. May, The Laws of Subtraction, London 2012, ISBN13: 9780071795616
4 STYLE 1: Time Period, Competition and Change ‘Egyptian art’, from E. Gombrich, The Story of Art, London 1950, ISBN 9780714832470
5 STYLE 2: Individual Style and Geographical Style Emily Kubo, ‘Harajuku Girls co-opted’ https://www.japaninc.com/article.php?articleID=1454
6 ORAL PRESENTATIONS
7 MIDTERM EXAM
8 IDEOLOGY 1: Classical Western and NonWestern Ideologies Janet Marquardt & Stephen Eskilson, “Alberti and 15th-Century Painting.” Frames of Reference: Art, History and the World, 2005, pp. 143-147, ISBN 10: 0072829486
9 IDEOLOGY 2: Modernism and Its Criticism ‘Futurism,’ from: R. Lambert, The Twentieth Century. The Cambridge Introduction to Art, Cambridge 1981, 21-26. ISBN 10: 0521296226
10 Term Paper preparation; turn in Term Paper Proposal
11 USE 1: Patron, Client and User ‘The Female Gaze. Women as art collectors: Isabella d’Este and Margaret of Austria’ https://thefemalegaze.org/2015/12/06/women-as-art-collectors-in-renaissance-europe-isabella-deste-and-margaret-of-austria/
12 USE 2: Function and Location Victor Papanek, “What is Design?”, in: Design for the Real World, London 1971, ISBN 0-394-47036-2
13 MEANING: The Cultural Context ‘The Bauhaus Stairway’, https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2002/oct/12/art
14 ORAL PRESENTATIONS
15 Semester Review
16 Final Exam
Course Notes/Textbooks
Suggested Readings/Materials
  • Frank Lloyd Wright, “Meaning of Materials – Glass,” from In the Cause of Architecture, 1975, 197-202. ISBN-10: 0070253501
  • ‘The Fed-ex logo’, from M. May, The Laws of Subtraction, London 2012, ISBN13: 9780071795616
  • ‘Egyptian art’, from E. Gombrich, The Story of Art, London 1950, ISBN 9780714832470
  • Emily Kubo, ‘Harajuku Girls co-opted’

https://www.japaninc.com/article.php?articleID=1454

  • Janet Marquardt & Stephen Eskilson, “Alberti and 15th-Century Painting.” Frames of Reference: Art, History and the World, 2005, pp. 143-147, ISBN 10: 0072829486
  • ‘Futurism,’ from: R. Lambert, The Twentieth Century. The Cambridge Introduction to Art, Cambridge 1981, 21-26. ISBN 10: 0521296226
  • ‘The Female Gaze. Women as art collectors: Isabella d’Este and Margaret of Austria’ https://thefemalegaze.org/2015/12/06/women-as-art-collectors-in-renaissance-europe-isabella-deste-and-margaret-of-austria/
  • Victor Papanek, “What is Design?”, in: Design for the Real World, London 1971, ISBN 0-394-47036-2
  • ‘The Bauhaus Stairway’,

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2002/oct/12/art

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Activities Number Weigthing
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
5
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
25
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterm
1
30
Final Exam
1
30
Total

Weighting of Semester Activities on the Final Grade
4
70
Weighting of End-of-Semester Activities on the Final Grade
1
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Semester Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
2
32
Laboratory / Application Hours
(Including exam week: 16 x total hours)
16
Study Hours Out of Class
12
2
24
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Portfolio
Homework / Assignments
1
2
Presentation / Jury
1
3
Project
1
9
Seminar / Workshop
Oral Exam
Midterms
1
10
Final Exams
1
10
    Total
90

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Competencies/Outcomes
* Contribution Level
1
2
3
4
5
1

To be able to equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge of industrial design, and to apply it to a variety of products, services and systems from conventional industries to urban scale with innovative and sustainable approaches

X
2

To be able to communicate design concepts and proposals for solutions, which are supported with quantitative and qualitative data, to specialists and non-specialists through visual, written, and oral means

X
3

To be able to equipped with the related theoretical and methodological knowledge of engineering, management, and visual communication that is required for interdisciplinary characteristic of industrial design; and to collaborate with other disciplines, organizations, or companies

X
4

To be able to equipped with the knowledge of history and theory of design, arts and crafts; and culture of industrial design

X
5

To be able to equipped with social, cultural, economic, environmental, legal, scientific and ethical values in the accumulation, interpretation and/or application of disciplinary information and to employ these values regarding different needs

6

To be able to develop contemporary approaches individually and as a team member to solve today’s problems in the practice of industrial design

X
7

To be able to define design problems within their contexts and circumstances, and to propose solutions for them within the discipline of industrial design considering materials, production technologies and ergonomics

8

To be able to use digital information and communication technologies, physical model making techniques and machinery, at an adequate level to the discipline of industrial design

9

To be able to employ design research and methods within the theory and practice of industrial design

10

To be able to recognize the need and importance of a personal lifelong learning attitude towards their chosen specialization area within the industrial design field

11

To be able to collect data in the areas of industrial design and communicate with colleagues in a foreign language ("European Language Portfolio Global Scale", Level B1)

X
12

To be able to speak a second foreign language at a medium level of fluency efficiently

X
13

To be able to relate the knowledge accumulated throughout the human history to their field of expertise

X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest