COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Fundamentals of Mathematics
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MATH 111
Fall
3
0
3
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s)
Course Objectives This course aims to provide basic concepts of Mathematics such as functions, sets, matrices. Students will learn several mathematical and statistical concepts, methods and procedures used in social sciences, including matrices, functions, statistics, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing. The course demonstrates how mathematical and statistical methods can serve to provide tools for improving managerial decision skills.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • will be able to use properties of sets and set operations
  • will be able evaluate basic probabilities by using permutations and combinations.
  • will be able to understand and sketch the graph of basic functions. To be able to determine inverse and transpose of a matrix and linear equations and algebric operations on matrices.
  • will be able to understand fundamental elements of Statistics and Types of Data.
  • will be able to understand fundamental elements of Probability Theory; Sample spaces, Assignment of Probabilities, Events, Mutually exclusive events, Conditional probability, Independent events.
Course Content Sets, functions, matrices, introduction to statistics, data types and collecting data, permutation, combination, probability function, random variable, their expected values and variances and distribution fuctions.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
CORE
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Sets; Introduction to sets, Subset, Proper Subset; Universal Set; Operations on sets, Ven Diagrams; Complement of a set; De Morgan's properties; The number of elements in a set. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Chapter 2)
2 Linear equations; Lines; The graph of an equation; Intercepts; Equation of a vertical line; Slope of a line; Pointslope form of an equation of a line; Equation of a horizontal line; SlopeIntercept form of an equation of a line(Theorem) Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Section 6.7)
3 Pairs of lines; Coincident lines (Theorem); Parallel lines; Intersecting lines. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Chapter 9 Section 9.1)
4 Matrices; Matrix algebra; Square matrix; Multiplication of Matrices. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Chapter 7 Section 7.3) S Lipschutz, 3000 solved problems in linear algebra; McGrow Hill. ( Chapter 2 )
5 The inverse of a matrix, transpose of a matrix; Determinant of a matrix S Lipschutz, 3000 solved problems in linear algebra; McGrow Hill. (Chapter 4)
6 Mappings and functions; Mappings, The domain and image sets, Notation. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Section 6.10)
7 Graphs of functions Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Section 6.10)
8 Constant functions, quadratic functions, exponential function. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Section 6.10)
9 Permutation and combinations; The counting formula; the multiplication principle, Factorials. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson. (Section 12.8, 12.9)
10 Introduction to probability; Sample spaces, Assignment of probabilities; properties of the probability of an event; expected value. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson. (Section 12.1, 12.2, 12.4)
11 OR and AND problems, Independent events, Conditional Probability, The counting principle. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Section 12.6, 12.7, 12.8)
12 Introduction to Statistics: Data and Sampling Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson. (Section 13.1)
13 Frequence distributions, Statistical graphs. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson (Section 13.3,13.4)
14 The normal curve. Normal distribution. Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson. (Section 13.7)
15 Review
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Textbooks Allen R. Angel, C. Abbott and D. Runde, A survey of Mathematics with Applications, Pearson. S Lipschutz, “3000 solved problems in linear algebra”; McGrow Hill.
References “Calculus for Business, Economics, Life Sciences, and Social Sciences” by R.A. Barnett, M.R. Zie gler, K.E. Byleen, Prentice Hall.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
5
20
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
50
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
6
50
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
50
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
5
5
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
    Total
181

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to assess psychological concepts and perspectives, interpret and evaluate data using scientific methods X
2 To be able to develop a curiosity and interest towards the mind and its phenomena, to possess a sense of critical and scientific reflexion and ability to analyze new information. X
3 Ability to make use of theoretical and applied knowledge in local and global levels. X
4 To have a basic knowledge of other disciplines that can contribute to psychology and to be able to make use of this knowledge X
5 To possess and value societal, scientific and ethical principles in collecting, interpreting and publishing psychological data X
6 To have knowledge of how psychology is positioned as a scientific discipline from a historical perspective, and to know with what methods it views behavioural and mental processes X
7 To be able to distinguish between the emphases of fundamental theories and perspectives of psychology (behavioural, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, social, developmental, humanistic, psychodynamic and sociocultural) and compare and express their differences and similarities, contributions and limitations X
8 The competence to share psychological knowledge based and qualitative and quantitative data with experts and lay people, using effective communication skills X
9 To have the awareness of interpersonal and societal problems and phenomena and adopt this awareness in psychological problems and researches. X
10 Competence to make use of applied and theoretical psychological knowledge to make contributions to industrial development and provide solutions to problems X
11 To possess essential knowledge of techniques and instrumentation for psychological measurement and evaluation X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 

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