COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Globalization and The Media
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 404
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives a)probe into key understandings and conceptualizations of the globalization force b)point out historical and normative accounts of globalization processes, and their relation to cultural and media practices c)encourage students to apply theory to practice by drawing upon realworld case studies in the globalization of media and communications
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • develop awareness of the causes and dimensions of the phenomenon of globalization
  • specify the various ways in which the media can be used to effect change and development
  • identify the forces determining the global flow of information and entertainment
  • assess the effects of globalization on media production, distribution, and consumption
  • analyze the relationship between local and global in different media contexts
  • critically reflect on the implications of globalization process in regard to their own culture and media use
Course Content This course is designed to introduce students to diverse theories, concepts, and analyses related to the consequences of globalization processes in the social, economic, cultural and political realms



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to course Textbook: Sparks, C. (2007) Globalization, Development and the Mass Media. London: Sage Publications
2 What is globalization? Reading text: Bauman, Z. (1998) Globalization – The Human Consequences. New York: Columbia University Press
3 Modernity Reading text: Therborn, G. (1995) ‘Routes to/through Modernity’, in Featherstone, M., Lash, S., and Robertson, R. (eds) Global Modernities. London: Sage
4 Passing of Modernity Reading text: Giddens, A. (1999) Runaway World: How Globalization is Reshaping our Lives. London: Rrofile
5 Cultural Imperialism Reading text: Barker, C. (1997) Global Television: an Introduction. London: Blackwell
6 Media Imperialism Reading text: Tomlinson, J. (1999) Globalization and Culture. Cambridge: Polity
7 Media and Globalization Reading text: Rantanen, T. (2005) The Media and Globalization. London: Sage
8 Midterm Exam
9 Global Media Case studies: a)CNN: The World’s News Leader b)MTV Music Television c) www.google.com Tutorial: How to make a presentation
10 Global Audiences Case studies: a) Olympic Games b) Lost (ABC) c)www.youtube.com Tutorial: How to write an essay
11 Global – Local Case studies: a) Zee TV (hybrid TV) b) Al Jazeera News c) www.indymedia.org
12 Student Presentations of Group Reports case study (presentation) : Reuters b) case study (presentation) : Entertainment and Sports Network (ESPN) c) case study (presentation) : Microsoft Corporation d) case study (presentation) : your choice
13 Student Presentations of Group Reports a )case study (presentation) : Bollywood b) case study (presentation) : Children’s TV (Cartoon Network, Disney Channel, Fox Family Worldwide) c) case study (presentation) : TV Globo d) case study (presentation) : your choice ...
14 Revision and Panel Discussion Workshop (Delivery date of the essay)
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Textbooks a) course textbook b)lectures (PowerPoint presentations),c)seminars (thought questions and material for class discussion) d) workshops (case studies, role plays) sessions e) tutorials (how to make a presentation; how to write an essay)
References 1) Anderson, B. (1983) Imagined Communities. London: Verso 2) Appadurai, A. (1990) Modernity at Large. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press 3) Barker, C. (1997) Global Television: an Introduction. London: Blackwel 4) Barnett, C et al. (2006) A Demanding World. London: Open University Press 5) Bauman, Z. (1998) Globalization 6) The Human Consequences. New York: Columbia University Press 7) BoydBarrett, O. (2007) Communications, Media, Globalization and Empire, John Libbey & Co Ltd 8)Castells, M. (1999) The Rise of Network Society. Malden, MA: Blackwell 9) Dayan, D. & E. Katz. (1992) Media Events: The Live Broadcasting of History. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press 10) De Block, L. & D. Buckingham (2008) Global Children, Global Media. London: Palgrave 11) Durham, M. G. and Kellner, D. (eds.) (2006) Media and Cultural Studies: Key Works (revised edition), Oxford: Blackwell 12) Featherstone, M., Lash, S., and Robertson, R. (eds) (1995) Global Modernities. London: Sage 13) Giddens, A. (1990) The Consequences of Modernity. Stranford University Press 14) Giddens, A. (1999) Runaway World: How Globalization is Reshaping our Lives. London: Rrofile 15) Gillespie, M. (2005) Media Audiences. London: The Open University Press 16) Golding, P. and Harris, P., (eds,) (1997) Beyond Cultural Imperialism. London: Sage. 17) Hardt, M. and Negri, A. (2000) Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press 18) Harvey, D. (1990) The Condition of Postmodernity. Malden, MA: Blackwell 19) Lyotard, J. (1984) The Postmodern Condition. Manchester: Manchester University Press 20) Madianou, M. (2005) Mediating the Nation. London: UCL Press 21) McLuhan, M and Powers, B. (1989) The Global Village: Transformation in World Life & 21st Century. Oxford University Press 22) Morley, D. Robins, K. (1995) Spaces of Identity: Global Media, Electronic Landscapes and Cultural Boundaries. London: Routledge 23) Peters, J.D. (2001) “Witnessing”, in Media, Culture & Society, 23(6) 24) Rantanen, T. (2005) The Media and Globalization. London: Sage 25) Robertson, R. (1992) Globalization. London: Sage 26) Said, E. (1978) Orientalism. London: Routledge 27) Sassen, S. (2001) Global Networks, Linked Cities. New York: Routledge 28) Schiller, H. (1969) Mass Communication and American Empire 29) Silverstone, R. (1999) Why Study the Media? London: Sage 30) Silverstone, R. (2006) Media and Morality: On the Rise of the Mediapolis. London: Polity 31)SrebernyMohammadi, A. (1997) “The many faces of cultural imperialism,” in Golding, P. and Harris, P., Beyond Cultural Imperialism (pp. 4968), London: Sage 32) Thussu, D. (ed.) (2009) International Communication: a Reader. London: Routledge 33) Tomlinson, J. (2001) Cultural Imperialism. London: Pinter 34) Tomlinson, J. (1999) Globalization and Culture. Cambridge: Polity 35) Thompson, J. (1995) The Media and Modernity: A Social Theory of the Media. Cambridge: Polity 36) Van Dijk, J. (1999) The Network Society: Social Aspects of New Media. London: Sage 37) Waters, M. (2000) Globalization (Key Ideas) (2nd edition). London: Routledge Further sources Print Journals: 1) Communication, Culture & Critique 2) Communication, Politics & Culture 3) Communication Research 4) Cultural Studies 5) European Journal of Communication 6) European Journal of Cultural Studies 7) Global Media and Communication 8) Information, Communication & Society 9) Interactions: Studies in Communication & Culture 10) Javnost – The Public 11) Journal of Communication Inquiry 12) Journal of Global Mass Communication 13) Media, Culture and Society 14) New Media & Society 15) Political Communication 16) Popular Communication: The International Journal of Media and Culture 17) Postmodern Culture 18) Screen 19) Television & New Media Open Access Journals: 1) First Monday 2)Global Media Journal 3)International Journal of Communication 4) Journal of ComputerMediated Communication 5) Journal of eMedia Studies 6) M/C Journal: A Journal of Media and Culture 7) Nordic Review: Nordic Research on Media and Communication 8) Platform: Journal of Media and Communication 9) Spaces of Identity 10) Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture 11) Transformations 12) 3CMedia: Journal of Community, Citizen’s and Third Sector Media and Communication

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
1
15
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
14
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
1
6
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
1
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
3
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
134

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 

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