COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Digital Media Theory
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 380
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To provide a theoretical introduction by making a focus on the digital media technologies.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • define the foundation for today’s digital communication technologies in the frame of their historical development.
  • differentiate digital media from traditional media in a theoretical context.
  • discuss how communication technologies diffuse through society.
  • elaborate on the ways in which digital media is being consumed and its effects.
  • discuss how information and culture are shared and organized in the virtual environments
  • critically analyze their inclusion in virtual communities.
Course Content The course will cover such matters like the concept of new media, genres, networked sociality, interaction, distribution, and narrative with attention to audience uses. These will be handled by making a focus on the past, present, and future of digital communication technologies.



ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction
2 Defining new nedia Lev Manovich, "How Media Became New," Language of New Media, pp. 2126.
3 Historical context of new media Max More, "Grasping the Future: Comparing Scenarios to Other Techniques”
4 New media in everyday life Martin Lister, “New Media in Everyday Life,” New Media: A Critical Introduction, pp. 219280.
5 Society and technology Raymond Williams, “The Technology and the Society,” Television, pp. 126.
6 Convergence Culture Henry Jenkins, Convergence Culture
7 Digital cultures Lankshear and Knobel, “Online memes, affinities, and cultural production in new media literacies,” in C. Lankshear and M. Knobel (Eds.), A New literacies sampler, pp. 199227.
8 Midterm exam
9 Virtual reality and cyberculture Donna Haraway, “A Cyborg Manifesto”
10 Media networks Manuel Castells, “Toward a sociology of the network society”
11 Virtual communities Georg Simmel, “The sociology of sociability”
12 Participatory media literacies D. Gillmor, "Principles for a new media literacy"
13 Digital gaming Roger Caillois, "The Definition of Play" and "The Classification of Games"Alexander Galloway, "Gamic Action, Four Moments"
14 Presentations and discussion
15 Review of the semester
16 Final exam
Course Textbooks Soft copy notes will be available on the lecturer’s website. Hard copies will be handled during the semester.
References Other sources are the digital media samples accessible through the Web.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
20
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
10
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
10
Final / Oral Exam
1
10
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication.
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 

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