COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Media, Society and Politics in Turkey
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 208
Spring
3
0
3
5
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The primary objective of the course is to enable the students to understand and analyze better the diversities and vicissitudes of political life, institutions and processes in Turkey in the context of media studies.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Students should have a fundamental knowledge of Turkish politics and society within the conceptual framework.
  • Students will define the major theoretical approaches to understanding Turkish political and cultural development by enumerating their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Students will be able to identify specific problems in Turkish politics, society and culture.
  • Students will be able to apply theoretical concepts to specific international and domestic political issues.
  • Students should summarize by reporting their findings related to the description, assessment or resolution of problems in Turkish society.
  • Students should able to discuss the key issues of Turkish politics, society and culture.
  • Students should demonstrate an ability to write a paper with a clear thesis statement or question by supporting this statement or addressing this question in a logical manner in order to draw logical conclusions from their findings.
Course Content This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to Turkish politics through examining its cultural context, institutional structure, sociopolitical processes, as well as social movements and developments that have shaped the political system of the country.




ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Presentation and overview of the course, course organization, requirements and methods of evaluation.
2 Turkish Politics in the Early Republican Era. Basic Reading: Feroz Ahmad, The Making of Modern Turkey, Routledge, 1993, pp.1-72; Şerif Mardin, ‘Center-Periphery Relations: A Key to Turkish Politics?’ Daedalus, Vol. 102 (1973): 169-90. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20024114. Further Reading: Serif A. Mardin, ‘Ideology and Religion in the Turkish Revolution’, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 2, No. 3 (Jul., 1971), pp. 197-211. http://www.jstor.org/stable/162194;Mustafa Türkeş, ‘A Patriotic Leftist Development-Strategy Proposal in Turkey in the 1930s: The Case of the Kadro (Cadre) Movement’, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 33, No. 1 (Feb., 2001), pp. 91-114.
3 The Republic's Official Ideology: Kemalism Basic Reading:Paul Dumont, ‘The Origins of Kemalist Ideology’, in Jacob M. Landau, Atatürk and the Modernization of Turkey,Westview Press, E.J. Brill, 1984,pp.25-44; Reşat Kasaba, 1997. “Kemalist Certainties and Modern Ambiguities”, in Bozdogan and R. Kasaba (eds.), Rethinking Modernity in Turkey, pp.15- 36. Further Reading:Hugh Poulton, Top Hat, Grey Wolf and Crescent, Turkish Nationalism and Turkish Republic, Hurst & Company, London, 1997, pp.87-129; N. Eisenstadt, ‘The Kemalist Regime and Modernization’, in Jacob M. Landau, Atatürk and the Modernization of Turkey,Westview Press, E.J. Brill, 1984, pp.3-16; Levent Köker, Modernleşme, Kemalizm ve Demokrasi, İletişim Yayınları, 2011.
4 Modernity Basic Reading: Dankwart A. Rustow, ‘The Modernization in Turkey in Historical and Comparative Perspective’, in Kemal H. Karpat and Contributers, Social Change and Politics in Turkey, Leiden E.J. Brill, 1973, pp.93-122; Emel Sönmez, ‘Turkish Women in Turkish Literature of the 19th Century’, Die Welt des Islams, New Series, Vol. 12, Issue 1/3 (1969), pp. 1-73. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1570297;Devrim Sezer, ‘The anxiety of cultural authenticity in Turkish communitarian thought: Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar and Peyami Safa on Europe and modernity’, History of European Ideas 36 (2010) 427–437, www.elsevier.com/locate/histeuroideas; Further Reading: Nezih Erdoğan, ‘The Spectator in the Making: Modernity and Cinema in Istanbul’/ “Bir Seyirci Yapmak: 1896 – 1928 arası İstanbul’da Sinema ve Modernlik”, 1896-1928”, in Deniz Göktürk, Levent Soysal and İpek Türeli (eds), Orienting Istanbul: Cultural Capital of Europe?, 2010, London, Routledge, 2010, pp.129-143;Kemal H.Karpat, ‘Structural Change, Historical Stages of Modernization and the Role of Social Groups in Turkish Politics, in Kemal Karpat and Contributers, Social Change and Politics in Turkey, Leiden E.J. Brill, 1973 pp.11-92;Mehmet Burak ‘The Advent of the Electric Telegraph in the Ottoman Empire’ in Roderic H. Davidson, Essays in Ottoman and Turkish History 1774-1923, University of Texas Press, 2011, pp.133-165.
5 The Military-Bureaucratic Elite and the State Tradition Basic Reading: Metin Heper, ‘Political Modernization as Reflected in Bureaucratic Change: The Turkish Bureaucracy and a"Historical Bureaucratic Empire’, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Oct., 1976), pp. 507-521. http://www.jstor.org/stable/162507;Bernard Lewis, The Emergence of Modern Turkey, Oxford University Press, 2002, pp.443-47. Further Reading: Frederick W. Frey, The Turkish Political Elite, The M.I.T. Press, 1965, pp.29-111; Serif Mardin, ‘Power, Civil Society and Culture in the Ottoman Empire’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 11, No. 3 (Jun., 1969), pp. 258-281. http://www.jstor.org/stable/178085;Belge, Murat (2009) “Türkiye’de Aydınlar ve Roman Kahramanları” Sanat ve Edebiyat Yazıları içinde. Ankara: İletişim.
6 Mid-Term I
7 Nationalism and Far Right Basic Reading: Hugh Poulton, Top Hat, Grey Wolf and Crescent, Turkish Nationalism and Turkish Republic, Hurst & Company, London, 1997, pp. 130-167; Further Reading:Tanıl Bora, Türk Sağının Üç Hali, Birikim Yayınları, 1999; Füsun Üstel, İmparatorluktan Ulus Devlet’e Türk Milliyetçiliği: Türk Ocakları 1912-1931, İletişim Yayınları, 2010; Güney, A. (2006-07). Resmi Milliyetçilikten Popüler Milliyetçiliğe Geçiş: 1960 Sonrası Türk Sineması Üzerine Siyasal Bir Deneme. Doğu Batı, 39, 209-226.
8 Turkey's Political System Basic Reading: C.H. Dodd, ‘The Development of Turkish Democracy’, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, Vol. 19, No. 1 (1992), pp. 16-30. http://www.jstor.org/stable/195430; Yiğit Akin, ‘Reconsidering State, Party, and Society in Early Republican Turkey: Politics of Petitioning’, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Aug., 2007), pp. 435-457. http://www.jstor.org/stable/30069529; Further Reading:Meti̇n Heper and Menderes Çinar, ‘Parliamentary Government with a Strong President: The Post-1989 Turkish Experience’, Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 111, No. 3 (Autumn, 1996), pp. 483-503. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2151972.
9 Political Economy: Economic Development, Class Structures and Political Change Basic Reading: Çağlar Keyder, State and Class in Turkey, Verso, 1987; Doǧu Ergil, Class Relations and the Turkish Transformation in Historical Perspective, Studia Islamica, No. 39 (1974), pp. 77-94. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1595272; Further Reading:Çağlar Keyder, “Liberalization from Above and the Future of the Informal Sector: Land, Shelter, and Informality in the Periphery” in Informalization. Process and Structure, eds. Faruk Tabak and Michaeline Crichlow, 2000: 119-132; Yılmaz Akyüz and Korkut Boratav, “The Making of the Turkish Financial Crisis” World Development, vol. 31, no. 9, 2003: 1549-1566;Ayse Öncü “The Banal and the Subversive: Re-thinking Commercial Television in Turkey”, European Journal of Cultural Studies, Vol. 3, No.3, Sept. 2000; Ayse Öncü “The New Media Landscape in Turkey”, in Balkan Media, 1997; Gürbilek, Nurdan (2003). “Dandies and Originals: Authenticity, Belatedness, and Turkish Novel”, The South Atlantic Quarterly 102: 2/3, Spring/Summer.
10 Social Democracy, Socialism and the Radical Left Basic Reading: Kemal H. Karpat, ‘The Turkish Left’, Journal of Contemporary History, Vol. 1, No. 2, (1966), pp. 169-186. http://www.jstor.org/stable/259929; Doǧu Ergil, Class Relations and the Turkish Transformation in Historical Perspective, Studia Islamica, No. 39 (1974), pp. 77-94. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1595272; Further Reading: Bülent Ecevit, ‘Labour in Turkey as a New Social and Political Force’ in Kemal H. Karpat and Contributers, Social Change and Politics in Turkey, Leiden E.J. Brill, 1973 pp.151-181;Türkiye’de Solun ve Sol Düşüncenin Tarihi Üzerine’, in Mehmet Ö. Alkan, Tanıl Bora, Murat Koraltürk (Derleyenler), Mete Tunçaya’a Armağanİletişim Yayınları, pp.253-539.
11 Gender and Politics: Turkish Feminism Basic Reading: Deniz Kandiyoti, ‘Sex Roles and Social Change: A Comparative Appraisal of Turkey's Women’, Signs, Vol. 3, No. 1, (Autumn, 1977), pp. 57-73. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3173079;Nükhet Sirman, ‘Feminism in Turkey: A Short History’, New Perspectives on Turkey, 3/1, Fall 1989; Further Reading:Z. Seda Özcan, ‘The Dual Identity of Roza Journal: Womanhood and Ethnicity in the Context of Kurdish Feminism’, TJP Turkish Journal of Politics Vol. 2 No. 2 Winter 2011; Dönmez-Colin, G. (2008). Turkish Cinema: Identity, Distance and Belonging. London: Reaktion Books; Güçlü, Ö. (2010). Silent Representations of Women in the New Cinema of Turkey. sinecine: Sinema Araştırmaları Dergisi, 1(2), 71-85; Dönmez-Colin, G. (2006). Kadın, İslam ve Sinema (D. Koç, Çev.). İstanbul: Agora; Emel Sönmez, ‘Turkish Women in Turkish Literature of the 19th Century’, Die Welt des Islams, New Series, Vol. 12, Issue 1/3 (1969), pp. 1-73. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1570297;Arslan, Umut Tumay (2005). Bu Kabuslar Neden Cemil: Yeşilçamda Erkeklik ve Mazlumluk. İstanbul: Metis.
12 Islamism vs Secularism Basic Reading: Hugh Poulton, Top Hat, Grey Wolf and Crescent, Turkish Nationalism and Turkish Republic, Hurst & Company, London, 1997, pp.168-206; Haldun Gülalp, ‘The Poverty of Democracy in Turkey: The Refah Party Episode’, New Perspectives on Turkey, Fall 1999, 35-59. Further Reading: Ahmet T. Kuru ‘Globalization and Diversification of Islamic Movements: Three Turkish Cases’, Political Science Quarterly, Vol. 120, No. 2 (Summer, 2005), pp. 253-274. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20202518; Ayse Öncü “Packaging Islam: Cultural Politics on the Landscape of Turkish Television”, in Public Culture, 8(1):51-71, 1995;Maktav, Hilmi (2010). Sinema ya da İlahi Aşk: İslami Sinemada Tasavvufi Yolculuklar. sinecine: Sinema Araştırmaları Dergisi, 1(2), 31-55;İmançer, D. (2010). İslamcı Filmlere Kadın Temsili. sinecine: Sinema Araştırmaları Dergisi, 1(1), 77-95.
13 Kurdish Question/ Minorities/Turkish Nationalism Basic Reading: Mesut Yeğen, ‘The Kurdish Question in Turkish State Discourse’, Journal of Contemporary History, Vol. 34, No. 4 (Oct., 1999), pp. 555-568. http://www.jstor.org/stable/261251; Philip Robins, ‘The Overlord State: Turkish Policy and the Kurdish Issue’, International Affairs (Royal Institute of International Affairs 1944-), Vol. 69, No. 4(Oct., 1993), pp. 657-676. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2620591. Further Reading: Turkish Popular Cinema: National Claims, Transnational Flows. The International Journal of the Humanities, 6(3), 77-87; Arslan, M. (Der.) Kürt Sineması: Yurtsuzluk, Sınır ve Ölüm, İstanbul, Agora, 2009; Monceau, N. (2009). Sinema ve Ulusal Kimlik. S.Vaner (Haz.), 21. Yüzyıla Girerken Türkiye (s. 606-619). İstanbul: Kitap; Mesut Yeğen, ‘Jewish-Kurds or the New Frontiers of Turkish Nationalism’, Patterns of Prejudice, Vol. 41, no. 1. 2007.
14 Migration and Poverty Basic Reading: Bahattin Akşit, “Studies in Rural Transformation in Turkey. 1950-1990” in Culture and Economy, ed. Paul Stirling, Cambridgeshire: The Eothen Press, 1993: 171-185;Çağlar Keyder, “The Genesis of Petty Commodity Production in Agriculture,” in Culture and Economy, ed. Paul Stirling, Cambridgeshire: The Eothen Press, 1993: 187-200; Ayşe Öncü, “The Politics of the Urban Land Market in Turkey: 1950-1980,” International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, vol. 12, no. 1, 1988: 38-64. Further Reading:Necmi Erdoğan, Yok-sanma: Yoksulluk-Maduniyet ve “Fark Yaraları”,Yoksulluk Halleri , Ed. Necmi Erdoğan, De:ki, 2002, s.33-64;Ömer Laçiner, “Bir Süreç ve Durum Olarak Yoksulluğu Sorgulamak”, Yoksulluk Halleri , Ed. Necmi Erdoğan, De:ki, 2002, s.206-213; Maktav, H. (2001). Türk Sinemasında Yoksulluk ve Yoksul Kahramanlar. Toplum ve Bilim, 89, 161-189; Rifat N. Bali, Tarz-Hayattan Life Style'a Yeni Seçkinler, Yeni Mekanlar, Yeni Yaşamlar, İstanbul, İletişim, 2002; Türk sinemasında göç ve şehirleşme Gurbet Kuşları (Halit Refiğ, 1964) Gelin (Lütfi Akad, 1973);Diasporik Türk sineması Mercedes Mon Amour (Tunç Okan, 1987);Yıldız, E. (2008). Gecekondu Sineması. İstanbul: Hayalet.
15 General overview
16 Final exam
Course Textbooks Detailed bibliography of the course will be delivered
References Documentary screenings on Turkish politics and society

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
60
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
40
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
10
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
14
Final / Oral Exam
20
    Total
110

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest

 

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