COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Advertising and Consumer Culture
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PRA 424
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The goal of this course is to make us more aware of how advertising operates in society and how we live within consumer culture.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will be able to answer to the question: What are the goals of the advertising industry?
  • Will be able to answer to the question What information, ideas, and values are communicated in advertising?
  • Will be able to answer to the question What role does advertising play in television, movies, and magazines?
  • Will be able to answer to the question How do manufacturers and retailers create brandname products, and why do we care about these brands?
  • Will be able to answer to the question What do advertisers know about consumers?
  • Will be able to answer to the question Are we, as consumers, manipulated by advertising or do we make independent decisions about what to purchase? Is it possible to live in the modern world without adopting the values of consumer culture?
  • Will be able to answer to the question: Is it possible to resist the constant messages that tell us: "You are what you buy?" and should we maintain certain spaces in society that are free of advertising and commercial messages?
Course Content Consumers purchase consumer goods simply not just because they are useful. The consumer goods that we purchase speak volumes about who we are, what groups we belong to, and what we aspire to become. The goal of this course is to make us more aware of how advertising operates in society and how we live within consumer culture.

ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.
Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found at
http://iletisim.ieu.edu.tr/ai.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to course and expectations
2 The Rise of Consumer Society – 1 Cross, Gary. 2000. An AllConsuming Century: Why Commercialism Won in Modern America. New York: Columbia University Press. pp. 145175
3 The Rise of Consumer Society – 2 Gary Cross, An AllConsuming Century, 175206
4 New Times Gary Cross, An AllConsuming Century, 206232
5 Neoliberalism Harvey David.2005. A Brief History of Neoliberalism, New York: Oxford University Press. pp.130.
6 Midterm Exam
7 Advertising Leiss, William, Stephen Kline, Sut Jhally, Jackie Botterill. 2004. Social Communication in Advertising: Persons, Products and Images of WellBeing. (3rd Edition). London and New York: Routledge.pp. 332
8 Capitalism and Advertising Williams, Raymond. 2003. Advertising: The Magic System. In The Cultural Studies Reader, ed. S. During. London and New York: Routledge.
9 Advertising and Late Modern Consumer Society, Advertising and Semiotics Advertising and Late Modern Consumer Society, Reading: Leiss, 295332
10 Global and Local in Advertising Agencies Mazzarella, William. 2003. 'Very Bombay ': Contending with the Global in an Indian Advertising Agency. Cultural Anthropology. 18 (1): 3371.
11 Branding Naomi Klein, 2000. No Logo, Introduction and Chapter 1 (pp. 326). Picador: New York.Goldman, Robert and Stephen Papson. 1998. Nike Culture: The Sign of the Swoosh. London, Thousand Oaks, and New Delhi: Sage Publications. pp.
12 Global Economy, National Brands Ogan, C., F. Çiçek, Y. Kaptan. 2008. Reverse glocalization? Marketing a Turkish cola in the shadow of a giantJournal of Arab & Muslim Media Research, Volume 1:1
13 Final Paper Presentations
14 Final Paper Presentations
15 Final Paper Due – Semester Evaluation
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Textbooks Reading Materials: book chapters and articles, powerpoint presentations, case studies, papers
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
1
10
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
15
Presentation / Jury
1
3
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
6
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
    Total
140

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest