COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


Course Name
Political Communication and Public Opinion
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
PRA 402
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
5
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives The goal of this course is to comprehend different definitions and implications of the publics and to understand and identify the interrelation of media, politics and public opinion
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • why political communication is central to the democratic potential of the media
  • complex relationships among public relations, advertising, public sphere and the media
  • the interrelation of media and public service
  • contemporary concerns about the domination of media in politics pivot around the likely existence of a mediated public sphere
Course Content The concept of the public opinion is central to the democratic potential of the media. It is the place, space and attitude of citizens towards government and each other. Contemporary concerns about the domination of media in politics pivot around the likely existence of mediated public spheres. This class will examine the notion of the political communication with reference to global paradigms of media and politics.

ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.
Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one's own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.

A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found at
http://iletisim.ieu.edu.tr/ai.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to course and expectations
2 What is Political Communication? Brian McNair. 1995. An Introduction to Political Communication, London: Routledge. Pp. 13, 3/15, 27/42.
3 PR and Public Opinion Kevin Moloney. 2000. Rethinking Public Relations: PR Propoganda and Democracy. London and New York: Routledge. Pp. 15/26.
4 The Media, Markets and the Public Sphere David Croteau and William Hoynes. “Media, Markets, and the Public Sphere,” in The Business of Media: Corporate Media and the Public Interest, pp. 13/38.
5 Advertising and Political Campaigns Judith Trent and Robert Friedenberg. 2008. Political Campaign Communication: Principles and Practices, 6th edition. Lanham, MD. Rowman and Littlefield,. Pp. 320/358.
6 Political Advertising and Turkish Politics Guest Speaker: Özgür Seçim
7 Midterm
8 Political Talks and Persuasion Arno, Andrew. 1985. Impressive Speeches and Persuasive Talk: Traditional Patterns of Political Communication in Fiji’s Lau Group from the Perspective of Pacific Ideal Types, Oceania 56:2.
9 Ethnography of Political Communication Dorsey, Margaret. 2006. Pachangas: Borderlands Music, U.S. Politics and Transnational Marketing. Austin: University of Texas Press. Pp. 1/20; 168/192.
10 Rethinking the Political Campaigns Guest Speaker
11 Identity, Politics and Political Communication Louw, E. (2005), The Media and Political Process, London: Sage. Pp.93/117.
12 The New Media and Public Opinion Louw, E. (2005), The Media and Political Process, London: Sage. Pp.118/140.
13 Review of the Semester  
14 Review of the Semester  
15 Semester Evaluation
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Textbooks Reading Materials: book chapters and articles, powerpoint presentations, case studies
References Students will be given the opportunity to present their research to the rest of the class during the final three weeks of class. This inclass presentation should be approximately 5 minutes in length and allow for a further 2 minutes of Questions and Answers. A more detailed explanation will be offered in preparation for this assignment. Students will write an analytic research paper. Their analysis should focus on one of the parameters discussed in this class such as media ownership, public interest, market forces, and/or the exclusive or inclusive experience of the public sphere(s). One comprehensive inclass midterm and one final exam: The exams will consist of two sections: short answers, and a longer essay that synthesizes the concepts we have been learning during the semester. The exam format and subject matter will be discussed in more detail during the semester.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
25
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
25
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
6
Project
27
Seminar / Workshop
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
12
Final / Oral Exam
1
    Total
108

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest