COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


CLICK HERE FOR THE COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Name
Popular Culture
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MMC 401
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To engage students in critically thinking about popular culture and its roles in society.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • critically read popular cultural texts.
  • understand popular culture as an historical phenomenon.
  • comment on popular culture’s relationships to other types of culture and power.
  • discuss and critique popular culture in general and texts specifically.
  • discuss and critique a variety of approaches to the analysis of popular culture.
Course Content This course introduces students to the many approaches to discuss, theorise and analyse popular culture.





ACADEMIC CAUTION

Academic honesty: Plagiarism, copying, cheating, purchasing essays/projects, presenting some one else’s work as your own and all sorts of literary theft is considered academic dishonesty. Under the rubric of İzmir University of Economics Faculty of Communication, all forms of academic dishonesty are considered as crime and end in disciplinary interrogation. According to YÖK’s Student Discipline Regulation, the consequence of cheating or attempting to cheat is 6 to 12 months expulsion. Having been done intentionally or accidentally does not change the punitive consequences of academic dishonesty. Academic honesty is each student’s own responsibility.

Plagiarism is the most common form of academic dishonesty. According to the MerriamWebster Online Dictionary, to plagiarize means to steal and pass off (the ideas or words of another) as one’s own. The easiest and most effective way to prevent plagiarism is to give reference when using someone else’s ideas, and to use quotation marks when using someone else’s exact words.



A detailed informative guideline regarding plagiarism can be found here.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction, assign readings.
2 Topic: What is popular culture? The Culture and Civilisation tradition: Mathew Arnold and Levisism Analysis: The Godfather Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 13-26.
3 Topic: Culturalism: Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams Analysis: The Maltese Flacon Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 29-37
4 Topic: Culturalism: Stuart Hall Analysis: popular music Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 39-43
5 Topic: Marxism: the Frankfurt school Analysis: pop music videos Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 49-56
6 Topic: Marxism: Neo Gramscian Cultural Studies Analysis: punk, reggae and resistance music Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 63-70
7 Mid term examination
8 Topic: Structuralism Analysis: Film: Dances with Wolves Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 87-98
9 Topic: Post-structuralism: Discourse and power: Foucault, Fairclough and van Leeuwen Analysis: Film: Black Hawk Down Wodak, R. (2001) What is CDA?
10 Topic: Social Semiotics: van Leeuwen Analysis: Popular music videos Way, L. (2013), Discourses of popular politics, war and authenticity in Turkish pop music
11 Topic: Gender and Sexuality: Reading Romance and women’s soap operas Analysis: TV Soap operas Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 105-118
12 Presentations (9 Mayıs)
13 Topic: Postmodernism: Lyotard, Baudrillard Analysis: Film: Apocalypse Now Storey, J. (2001), Cultural Theory and Popular Culture, Pearson: Harlow, p. 129-137
14 Review for final examination
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Textbooks The suggested readings mentioned in this information sheet
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
30
Presentation / Jury
1
30
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
4
100
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
Presentation / Jury
1
20
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
20
Final / Oral Exam
30
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public.
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals.
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest