COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


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Course Name
Introduction to Communication Studies
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MMC 101
Fall
3
0
3
6
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Required
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This course aims to introduce the students issues to the approaches, methods, and concepts of media and communication studies, and helps them prepare for the advanced theory courses.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Will develop an understanding of how communication helps sustain individual and collective identities, as well as socialization.
  • Be able to discuss the relationship between language, communication and power.
  • Discuss the meanings of communicated messages in their wider social, political and historical contexts.
  • Develop an understanding of the main features and concepts of communication studies, and relate them with the local and global media and communication practices.
  • Relate the terminology of the field with other issues in social sciences and humanities, and use their skills in advanced communication theory courses.
Course Content This course provides students with the necessary theoretical and methodological knowledge to make them understand and analyze different forms and means of communication. The course defines the main issues and porous borders of the communication studies as a interdisciplinary field. It provides the students with the necessary analytical skills to criticize media texts.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
X
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to the course: An overview of the topics and themes
2 Understanding communication: Why, when, how we communicate Jones (2013). Communication in the Real World: An Introduction to Communication Studies, pp. 1-13; Dimbleby and Burton (1992). More than Words: An Introduction to Communication, pp. 1-40; Hartley (2002). Communication, Cultural and Media Studies, pp. 32-34; Williams (1985). Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society, pp. 72-73
3 Verbal and non-verbal communication; intrapersonal and interpersonal communication Barker and Gaut (2002). Communication, pp. 119-142; Beck, Bennett and Wall (2002). Communication Studies: The Essential Introduction, pp. 139-164 and 165-182
4 Group communication and organizational communication Barker and Gaut (2002). Communication, pp. 171-197
5 Midterm I
6 Communication and the media before printing Crowley and Heyer (2003). Communication in History: Technology, Culture, Society, pp. 23-30, pp. 61-66 and pp. 66-72
7 Printing (Book & newspaper) Crowley and Heyer (2003). Communication in History: Technology, Culture, Society, pp. 91-95, pp. 95-104 and pp. 113-117
8 Broadcasting (Telegraph, radio & TV) Crowley and Heyer (2003). Communication in History: Technology, Culture, Society, pp. 130-136, pp. 210-217 and pp. 244-254
9 The Internet Crowley and Heyer (2003). Communication in History: Technology, Culture, Society, pp. 301-311 and pp. 319-323; Fuchs (2014). Social Media, pp. 4-10
10 Mid Term II
11 Media ecology: Instiutions, regulation, technology and society Croteau and Hoynes (2005). The Business of Media: Corporate Media and the Public Interest, pp.13-38; Turow (2003). Media Today: An Introduction to Mass Communication. pp. 80-87; Burton (2007). Media & Society: Critical Perspectives, pp. 44-81
12 Supporting industries Baran (2014). Introduction to Mass Communication, pp. 339-404
13 Audience Burton (2007). Media & Society: Critical Perspectives, pp. 82-107
14 Review of the semester
15 Review of the semester
16 Final exam
Course Textbooks

A compilation of readings from a variety of sources listed in "weekly subjects" and the power point presentations of lectures.

References

Cultural texts, such as news, videos and ads will be used for discussions. The below references are also suggested:

Erol Mutlu (2004). İletişim Sözlüğü, Ütopya.
Ong (2002). Orality and Literacy, Routledge.
Oskay (2016). İletişimin ABC'si, Inkılap.

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
50
Final / Oral Exam
1
40
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
1
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
3
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
2
15
Final / Oral Exam
1
24
    Total
150

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice.
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest