COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


CLICK HERE FOR THE COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Name
TV Genres
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 470
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s)
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives This class investigates the form and content of contemporary television series in the global mediascape. Throughout the class, we will examine the aesthetic construction, audience appeal and socio-cultural functioning of various television genres. We will also closely examine the changing nature of television genres and their viewing in our age.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Identify different genres of television series and discern their main aesthetics qualities.
  • Examine the significance of genre in the planning and production of television programs.
  • Compare the causes and effects of the transformation of television series regarding their form and content in the 21th century.
  • Analyze how television series from different countries and regions across the globe interact and shape each other.
  • Explain how popular TV series both reflect and lead to cultural and political transformations.
  • Discuss the gender performances of globally popular television serials and their cultural impacts.
Course Content This course combines theoretical readings about the television genres and contemporary television with solid examples drawn from television series that circulate in the global mediascape. Discussion of readings and lecture will be accompanied by the screening of excerpts from several television series that will both exemplify and deepen the understanding of topics we will cover in this class.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
X
Supportive Courses
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Genre Studies-Introduction Jason Mittell. (2013). ‘Television Genres as Cultural Categories.’ In Genre and Television: From Cop Shows to Cartoons in American Culture, pp. 1-29.
2 Adaptations Across the Globe Vinicius, N. (2013). ‘More Than Copycat Television: Format Adaptation as Performance.’ In Global Television Formats: Understanding Television Across Borders, pp. 23-38. Beth Johnson & Laura Minor (2018) Shameless: Gendering Transnational Narratives, Feminist Media Studies, 19(2), pp. 1-16
3 Costume Dramas and Popular History Beaton, E. (2016). ‘Female Machiavellians in Westeros.’ In Women of Ice and Fire: Gender, Game of Thrones and Multiple Media Engagements, pp. 193-217.
4 “Chick Flick”, Feminism and Postfeminism in Television Serena Daalmans (2013). HBO's Girls: ‘I'm Busy Trying to Become Who I Am.’ Feminist Media Studies, 13(2), 359-362. Jane Arthurs (2003). Sex and the City and Consumer Culture: Remediating Postfeminist Drama, Feminist Media Studies, 3(1), pp. 83-98.
5 Television Audiences and Effects of Digitization Ang, I. (2006). Living Room Wars: Rethinking Media Audiences, pp. 16-28 & pp. 66-81. Evans, E. (2011). ‘Downloading Television: Agency, Immediacy and the Transmedia Audience’ In Transmedia Television: Audiences, New Media, and Daily Life, p. 145- 172.
6 Melodramas as Instruments of Social Change Andrew Skuse and Marie Gillespie. (2012). ‘Gossiping for Change.’ In Drama for Development: Cultural Translation and Social Change, pp. 273-294. Christa Salamandra. (2012). The Muhannad Effect: Media Panic, Melodrama, and the Arab Female Gaze. Anthropological Quarterly 85(1), pp. 45-77.
7 Complex Melodrama Linda Williams (2012). Mega-Melodrama! Vertical and Horizontal Suspensions of the “Classical.” Modern Drama, 55(4), pp. 523-543.
8 Globalization of Turkish TV Series and Their Effects The documentary - Kismet: How Turkish Soap Operas Changed the World. By Nina Maria Pashalidou https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NX8Un4nneXg Kraidy, M. M., & Al-Ghazzi, O. (2013). Neo-Ottoman Cool: Turkish Popular Culture in the Arab Public Sphere. Popular Communication, 11(1), 17-29.
9 Soap Opera and Imagining the Nation Mauro Porto (2011). Telenovelas and Representations of National Identity. Media, Culture & Society, 33(1), pp. 53-69. Mar Chicharro Merayo (2013). Constructing and Reinforcing the Nation Through Television Fiction, European Journal of Cultural Studies 16(2), pp. 211-225.
10 Crime Drama and Televisual Masculinities Brian Faucette (2014). ‘Re-emergence of Hegemonic Masculinity in Breaking Bad.’ In Breaking Bad: Critical Essays on the Contexts, Politics, Style, and Reception of the Television Series, p. 73-86.
11 Reality Shows and Neoliberal World Ouellette, L., & Hay, J. (2008). Better Living Through Reality TV: Television and Post-welfare Citizenship, pp. 63-98.
12 Sci-Fi Series and Social Criticism George, S. A. (2008). ‘Desire, Gender, and the (Post)Human Condition in Battle Star Galactica.’ In The Essential Science Fiction Television Reader, pp. 159-176. Booker, M. K. (2008). ‘The Politics of Star Trek.’ In The Essential Science Fiction Television Reader, pp. 195-208.
13 Popular TV Series and Philosophical Reflections Jaarsma, A. S. (2010). ‘An Existential Look at Mad Men: Don Draper, Advertising, and the Promise of Happiness.’ In Mad Men and Philosophy: Nothing is as It Seems, pp. 95-109. J. J. Sylvia (2010). Doctor Who and Philosophy: Bigger on the Inside, pp. 157-166.
14 The Future of Television Genres in Digitized Times Mittell, J. (2015). Complex TV: The Poetics of Contemporary Television Storytelling, pp. 1-16.
15 Review of the semester
16 Final exam
Course Textbooks

The course uses the sources that are listed above in the weekly subjects and related preparations.

References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
40
Homework / Assignments
1
40
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
5
60
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
40
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
16
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
4
4
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
Final / Oral Exam
    Total
116

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline.
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process.
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level)

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest