COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


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Course Name
Advanced Radio Porduction
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 414
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator -
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives To engage students in the principles and techniques of advanced recorded radio and sound production by exploring, creating and analysing various genres of radio and audio production. It is highly recommended that MCS 413 Radio Production class has been successfully completed before taking this course.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Understand and apply principles and techniques of radio programme production from original ideas to advanced and complex final products.
  • Produce high quality recorded radio drama programming.
  • Produce high quality recorded documentary programming.
  • Contribute to a production team to produce a weekly dramatic production.
  • Discuss and critique a variety of radio and audio genres.
  • Be in a position to work at a professional level in a variety of capacities in a radio and sound studio environment.
Course Content Studio practice and audio editing are at the heart of this course. Students will have many hours of handson practice. This practice will be informed by weekly discussions of principles essential to making good audio productions.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction, discuss radio soap operas.
2 Types of microphones. Select story, select roles. Plan for 10 week run of soap. S. Alten (1986), Audio in Media, pp. 102150.
3 From plan to script, music, sound effects, jingles and promos Crook p. 3 11
4 Start recording radio soap opera. This continues every week until week 14. %30 Crook p. 12 15
5 Documentary review. McLeish (2005), Radio Production, pp.264275. Biewen p.
6 Planning documentaries, preproduction S. Alten (1986), Audio in Media, pp.264290. Biewen p.
7 Remotes McLeish (2005), Radio Production, pp.204212
8 Present midterm projects and dossiers (radio documentary) and critique (%30)
9 Miking speech. S. Alten (1986), Audio in Media, pp. 292308. McLeish (2005), Radio Production, pp.115127.
10 Drama review McLeish (2005), Radio Production, pp.242251. Crook 2130
11 Recording sound effects S. Alten (1986), Audio in Media, pp.417422.
12 Recording dramas S. Alten (1986), Audio in Media, pp.309315. Crook p. 30 37
13 Drama postproduction McLeish (2005), Radio Production, pp.252263. Ahiska p. 159 182
14 Present final projects and dossiers (radio drama) and critique (%30) McLeish (2005), Radio Production, pp.252263.
15 Review of the Semester  
16 Review of the Semester  
Course Textbooks Lecture and power point presentations
References

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
15
10
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
10
30
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
30
Final / Oral Exam
1
30
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
70
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
30
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
1
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
10
1
Presentation / Jury
Project
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
15
Final / Oral Exam
1
32
    Total
120

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies.
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public.
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution.
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1)
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level. X
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest