COURSE INTRODUCTION AND APPLICATION INFORMATION


CLICK HERE FOR THE COURSE SYLLABUS

Course Name
Social Media
Code
Semester
Theory
(hour/week)
Application/Lab
(hour/week)
Local Credits
ECTS
MCS 390
Fall/Spring
3
0
3
4
Prerequisites
None
Course Language
English
Course Type
Elective
Course Level
First Cycle
Course Coordinator
Course Lecturer(s) -
Assistant(s) -
Course Objectives Analyzing the impact of new fields opened by the new media, on mass communication and on our daily lives. Evaluating social media in a historical context. Analyzing how the different layers of society perceive and use the social media which emerged in front of our eyes during the past decade. Studying the mainstream media, the alternative media and the social media considering their differences, similarities and common grounds with a critical approach. Understanding the meaning of social media for disciplines such as political science, sociology, anthropology, economics, ecology and arts.
Learning Outcomes The students who succeeded in this course;
  • Evaluate the impact of social media on society,
  • Question the role of social media within the mainstream media and alternative media
  • Reflect on social media as a part of the whole communication history,
  • Analyze the impact and power of alternative media and the “alternativity” of alternative media,
  • Decode the new/different language generated by social media and alternative media,
  • Make comparative analysis on the function of traditional media and new media in social, political, cultural and economic fields
Course Content Asking questions on the impact of social media and alternative media on society. Guiding the communication scientists in understanding the new media.

 



Course Category

Core Courses
Major Area Courses
Supportive Courses
X
Media and Managment Skills Courses
Transferable Skill Courses

 

WEEKLY SUBJECTS AND RELATED PREPARATION STUDIES

Week Subjects Related Preparation
1 Introduction to course syllabus; goals; expectations and assignments
2 Technology & Society reading texts: 1)McLuhan, M. (1994) Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man. Cambridge: MIT Press (ch. 1) 2) Heidegger, M. (1993) Basic Writings: from Being and Time (1927) to The Task of Thinking (1964) (revised and expanded edition, edited by D. Krell). London: Routledge (ch. 7)
3 New Media reading texts: 1) Flew, T. (2008) New Media: an Introduction, 3rd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press (ch. 1) 2) Manovich, L. (2001) The Language of New Media. MIT Press (ch. 1)
4 Network Society 1)van Dijk, J. (2010) The Network Society, 2nd edition. London: Sage (chapter 2) 2) Castells, M. (2000) The Rise of the Network Society: The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture Vol. 1 (2nd edition). WileyBlackwell (conclusion: pp.500509)
5 Vırtual Community Virtual Identity reading texts: 1) Rheingold, H. (1994) Virtual Community: Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier. New York (chapter 1), accessed at: http://www.rheingold.com/vc/book/1.html 2) Turkle, S. (1995) Life on the Screen: Identity on the Age of the Internet. Simon & Schuster Inc: New York (ch. 7)
6 Presentations internet sites
7 Workshop new media practices
8 Midterm exam
9 Web Culture 1)Castells, M. (2001) The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business and Society. Oxford University Press (ch. 2) 2)Flew, T. (2008) New Media: an Introduction, 3rd edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press (ch. 6)
10 Social Media Applications I: blogs and social networking sites reading texts: 1) Boyd, D. (2006) "Identity Production in a Networked Culture: Why Youth Heart MySpace", in American Association for the Advancement of Science, St. Louis, MO. February 19, accessed at: http://www.danah.org/papers/AAAS2006.html
11 Social Media Applications II: content communities and collaborative projects (wikis) reading texts: 1) Golbeck, J 2007 ‘The dynamics of webbased social networks: membership, relationships and change’ in First Monday, vol. 12, no. 11, accessed at: http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2023/1889 2) Cobcroft, R 2010 ‘The state of the commons: case studies 2010’, PLATFORM: Journal of Media and Communication, special edn, December, accessed at: http://journals.culturecommunication.unimelb.edu.au/platform/resources/includes/cc/PlatformCCCobcroft.pdf
12 Issues for discussion I: civic vs commercial interests and freedom vs security key text: 1) Bennett, W.L. (2003) ‘Communicating global activism: strengths and vulnerabilities of networked politics’ Information, Communication & Society, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 143/168. 2) Safko, L. & Brake, D. (2009) The Social Media Bible: Tactics, Tools & Strategies for Business Success. NJ: Wiley, (ch. 1) 3) Castells, M. (2001) The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business and Society. Oxford University Press (ch. 6)
13 Issues for discussion II: argumentation vs cacophony and public vs private sphere key text: 1) Brundidge, J 2010 ‘Toward a theory of citizen interface with political discussion and news in the contemporary public sphere’, International Journal of Communication, vol.4, pp. 1056/1078 2) Wellman, B. (2001) "Physical Place and Cyber Place: The Rise of Personalized Networking," in International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 25 Special Issue on "Networks, Class and Place," edited by Talja Blokland and Mike Savage, accessed at: http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~wellman/publications/individualism/ijurr3a1.htm 3) Papacharissi, Z 2009 ‘The virtual sphere 2.0: the internet, the public sphere and beyond’, in A. Chadwick & P. Howard (eds.) Routledge Handbook of Internet Politics, Routledge, New York, pp. 230/245
14 Group Projects Social media practices
15 Position paper Evaluation of new media practices
16 Review
Course Textbooks 1)course handout 2)lectures (PowerPoint presentations) 3)seminars (thought questions and material for class discussion) 4)workshops (case studies, role plays) sessions 5)bibliography
References PRINT JOURNALS: 1)Communication, Culture & Critique 2)Communication Research 3)Cultural Studies 4)European Journal of Communication 5)Information,Communication & Society 6)Interactions: Studies in Communication & Culture 7)Javnost – The Public 8)Journal of Communication Inquiry 9)Journal of ComputerMediated Communication 10) Media, Culture and Society 11)New Media & Society 12)Postmodern Culture 13)Technology & Culture 14)Television & New Media OPEN ACCESS JOURNALS: 1)Culture Machine 2)Cyborg Subjects 3)First Monday 4)Global Media Journal 5)International Journal of Communication 6)Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements 7)Journal of ComputerMediated Communication 8)Journal of eMedia Studies 9)M/C Journal: A Journal of Media and Culture 10)Platform: Journal of Media and Communication 11)Spaces of Identity 12)The Fibreculture Journal 13)Transformations 14)Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture 15)Wired 16) 3CMedia: Journal of Community, Citizen’s and Third Sector Media and Communication

 

EVALUATION SYSTEM

Semester Requirements Number Percentage
Participation
1
20
Laboratory / Application
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
20
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
30
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
10
Final / Oral Exam
1
20
Total

Contribution of Semester Work to Final Grade
4
80
Contribution of Final Work to Final Grade
1
20
Total

ECTS / WORKLOAD TABLE

Activities Number Duration (Hours) Workload
Course Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
3
48
Laboratory / Application Hours
Including exam week: 16 x total hours
16
Study Hours Out of Class
15
2
Field Work
Quizzes / Studio Critiques
Homework / Assignments
1
18
Presentation / Jury
Project
1
15
Seminar / Workshop
Portfolios
Midterms / Oral Exams
1
5
Final / Oral Exam
1
7
    Total
123

 

COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM QUALIFICATIONS RELATIONSHIP

#
Program Qualifications / Outcomes
* Level of Contribution
1
2
3
4
5
1 To be able to critically discuss and interpret the theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of media and communication discipline. X
2 To have the fundamental knowledge and ability to use the technical equipment and software programs required by the mediaproduction process. X
3 To be able to use the acquired theoretical knowledge in practice. X
4 To be able to critically interpret theoretical debates concerning the relations between the forms, agents, and factors that play a role in the field of media and communication. X
5 To be able to critically discuss and draw on theories, concepts and ideas that form the basis of other disciplines complementing the field of media and communication studies. X
6 To be informed about national, regional, and global issues and problems; to be able to generate problemsolving methods depending on the quality of evidence and research, and to acquire the ability to report those methods to the public. X
7 To be able to gather, scrutinize and use with scientific methods the necessary data to for the processes of production and distribution. X
8 To be able to use and develop the acquired knowledge and skills in a lifelong process towards personal and social goals. X
9 To be able to follow developments in new technologies of media and communication, as well as new methods of production, new media industries, and new theories; and to be able to communicate with international colleagues in a foreign language. (“European Language Portfolio Global Scale,” Level B1) X
10 To be able to use a second foreign language at the intermediate level.
11 To be able to use computer software required by the discipline and to possess advancedlevel computing and IT skills. (“European Computer Driving Licence”, Advanced Level) X

*1 Lowest, 2 Low, 3 Average, 4 High, 5 Highest